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Mediacurrent: 5 Digital Focus Areas to Navigate University Marketing Challenges

Main Drupal Feed - 4 hours 34 min ago

As we look ahead to the end of the future academic year and what the future looks like, we see uncertainty clouding what is a typical admissions season for teams in higher education. 

Recently, we asked our partners in higher education to share their digital challenges. We heard that admissions personnel, as well as marketing teams at the college and university level, are feeling the pressure. They need to make sure the expectations of stakeholders are met or exceeded despite the unpredictable path ahead. 

Even though teams may face challenges ahead, one thing is certain: rethinking digital strategy to set your path forward will set your team up for success and your institution apart from others. 

The website is the heart of your digital strategy, and both should be built to adapt. That’s why many higher education institutions choose Drupal for their organization’s CMS. 

Below are five areas to focus your digital strategy, with some of our favorite tips and tools to improve campaigns moving forward.

Reevaluate Your Content Strategy

Universities used to enjoy a steady flow of students enrolling in programs. However, the future is now uncertain because of the COVID-19 pandemic leading many students to forego education or to choose online courses over taking classes in a traditional, physical environment. 

The uncertainty affected not just marketing teams at universities, but students as well. When the McKinsey higher education survey was conducted in April 2020, 37% of responding students were confident that things would return to normal by the end of summer. However, the 2020-2021 school year has thus far reflected much of what the previous school year 

Findings from our own client survey showed that uncertainty in the 2020 recruitment season led to several shifts in strategy to further help the user journey in the decision making process of choosing programs such as the following: 

  • Virtual tours rather than in-person tours
  • Live video conferences rather than in-person sessions
  • Website content to supplement brochures and physical marketing materials

Changes in academia lead to a shift in messaging, so teams need to evaluate if their content strategy is still working or if more needs to be done to cater to today’s student and their new priorities. 

Some ways in which evaluating content strategy can be done include: 

Persona research

 Although you may have a general idea of who your target audience is, more thorough research that includes user surveys can help create a better understanding of who your content should speak to. For instance, you may learn from user surveys that students and parents are uncertain about returning to in-person learning because they want to know more about what is being done to keep people safe in the classroom. With this information in mind, you might develop more content about COVID-19 cleaning protocols to give them peace of mind.

Content audit

Is your content resulting in growth, and does it cater to your users? If you are not getting the most out of it, an audit can help address gaps and find opportunities. 

Dashboard creation

Making sense of data is an important responsibility of a university’s marketing team. User-friendly dashboards can simplify the process of reviewing data and making decisions based on findings. Working with a digital strategy team with experience in higher education to improve your approach can yield results that allow your content to better serve student needs.

Give Your Marketing Team The Tools to Succeed

Giving the university marketing team agency in creating content quickly and efficiently is a top priority of many agencies that work directly with these teams. However, finding a CMS that provides the flexibility they want and a user-friendly editorial experience they need can be a challenge.  

RainU CMS can improve the editorial experience for content editors looking for a solution that allows for easier workflows that match with your existing design standards. With the ability to launch sites in 30 days or less, Rain helps both content editors and developers create flexible websites fast.

If your site is on Drupal, creating a decoupled solution with Gatsby may be just what you need. The business case for decoupled Drupal with Gatsby can help you determine if the cost and benefits are right for your university. Our developers are well adept at providing guidance in setting up GatsbyJS.

Using Drupal with Gatsby is a great way to get an enterprise-quality CMS for free, paired with a great modern development experience and all the benefits of the JAMstack, like performance, scalability, and security.

Gatsbyjs.org

Make Smarter Use of Resources  

Unprecedented changes in higher education likely result in unexpected changes to budgets and priorities. Streamline the routine maintenance of your Drupal site to shift more budget toward new features. Here’s how Mediacurrent’s development solutions like Automated Updates and Multisite+ can help:

With Automated Updates, you can save hours of manual development work. Our automation services initiate pull requests, create JIRA issues, and stage updates within Pantheon’s multidev environment. Your team of project managers and developers can focus on productive work rather than administrative tasks when using Automated Updates for your project. 

Need to create multiple sites? Spin up new instances with Multisite+! With a shared codebase, your sites can go from concept to creation quickly and efficiently, and each has its own database, configuration, files, and base domain or URL to help with organizing your content. 

We have a wide variety of development services to meet your university marketing needs. 

Enhance Web Accessibility 

Universities cater to individuals of all abilities, so it’s important to make sure the digital experience is accessible to all. Using a tool like Siteimprove can help university marketing teams better understand how their site’s accessibility matches up to Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) standards. 

SiteImprove's automated reports provide an easy way to measure and document progress toward accessibility goals

Failing to keep on top of website accessibility could lead universities to face warnings from the Department of Education as well as lawsuits. Mitigation measures such as using Siteimprove or working with a skilled accessibility team to audit and remediate your site allows your team to take steps that minimize the possibility of lawsuits as a result of your site’s digital experience. 

Launch New Campaigns Faster 

Colleges and departments within universities often need to launch campaigns quickly, and depending on the technology involved, expediency is integral. Teams must have a workable solution to accomplish the goals of an individual college or department.

Marketing teams can take advantage of RainU CMS to launch to market in 30 days or less. 

Gain more control over your site with RainU CMS such as:  

  • Robust Security - Mitigate attacks from hackers - RainU CMS has several built-in security hardening features to help.
  • Flexible Content Feature-Packed - Build pages with a flexible, easy to use interface in RainU CMS for rapid development.
  • Component-Based Theme - Like with other Drupal sites, RainU CMS has reusable components and a built-in style guide which reduces design time.
Demo RainU CMS 

Ready to take your higher ed site and marketing campaigns to the next level? Explore how RainU CMS can get you there and check out the demo below. 

Specbee: Top 7 Remarkable Education Websites Built on Drupal (and Why was it Chosen)

Main Drupal Feed - 5 hours 32 min ago
Top 7 Remarkable Education Websites Built on Drupal (and Why was it Chosen) Shefali Shetty 26 Jan, 2021 Top 10 best practices for designing a perfect UX for your mobile app

What’s common between Universities and Drupal? Both are powered by communities and both fuel community-based initiatives. In this article, we will look at some amazing educational websites built on Drupal and why they choose Drupal as their CMS.

Did you know every Ivy league school website is built on Drupal while 71% of the top 100 Universities around the world use Drupal? Numbers speak volumes about a good CMS, but we have many more reasons to prove that Drupal is the best CMS for educational websites. Read on to find out.

This list has been curated with information obtained from https://www.drupal.org/case-studies

Why do top universities rely on Drupal

Top universities like Stanford, MIT, Oxford, and others alike, choose Drupal as their Content Management System. Universities are built on large communities – there’s the student community, the teaching staff community, the community of departments, the management, and other working staff. Being a community-driven CMS, Drupal helps knitting all these communities together. Drupal addresses issues in a way that streamlines information between each of its communities. 

  • Drupal allows for scalability to accommodate the ever-growing communities and varied web projects associated with them. The CMS is also well-known for dealing with a large user-base and high-traffic websites which is great for universities with a growing student base.
  • Drupal empowers educational institutes to build varied flexible solutions – from intranets to complex web applications to simple static web portals.
  • Drupal’s multi-site approach lets universities easily manage and create independent websites from a single codebase.
  • Features like multilingual, mobile-responsiveness, effective workflow management, access control, and others are now out-of-the-box with Drupal 8, thus making it an ideal choice for educational institutions.
Some Remarkable Education Institute Websites built on Drupal 1. George Washington University

Known best for producing some great leaders in every domain, George Washington University (GWU) relies on Drupal to create an engaging web presence for them. 

Why Drupal was chosen:
  • Drupal’s multisite feature now allows them to spin up new sites faster than ever before. 
  • Accessibility – GWU is committed to web accessibility and so is Drupal.
  • Responsive Web Design – The GWU website is completely responsive on all devices.
  • Ability to build scalable features and functionalities with customizable layouts.
  • GWU expected a reliable digital experience platform. And Drupal delivered.
  2. University of Oxford

The prestigious University of Oxford has been at the top of the world university rankings for five years in a row. They offer over 250 different programs with a student population of over 24,000.

Why Drupal was chosen:
  • The open-source nature of Drupal worked out well for them financially and also meant that they will not have to depend on one company for all their development needs.
  • A global community of driven developers working towards making Drupal better every day.
  • To collaborate and work better with other units of the university who were already using Drupal.
  • Drupal’s list of quality case studies, including the White House, turned out impressive enough to make the final call.
  3. Rutgers University

Rutgers is New Jersey’s state university and is one of the highest-ranked public universities in America with over 71,000 undergrad and grad students. They moved their website to Drupal more than 10 years ago.

Why Drupal was chosen:
  • They wanted a design that looked great on all devices.
  • To deliver a consistent user experience among their various school locations.
  • Distinguish between their different schools yet provide a unified experience.
  • Allowed for fast and easy admission application at different university locations.
  4. Bookshare

Although not a university, we had to mention the Bookshare website because it does a fantastic job at imparting knowledge to the visually challenged and people with learning difficulties. There are different formats of accessing the books – audio, large-sized printed, or braille.

Why Drupal was chosen:
  • Web accessibility – They needed to have the highest level of compliance (AAA) to ensure accessibility by the visually impaired.
  • Multilingual capabilities – Bookshare is made available to people across the world and is currently available in 7 different languages (and counting), thanks to Drupal’s multilingual feature and translation modules.
  • To support deep integration with their existing APIs.
  5. Georgia Tech Professional Education

Georgia Tech Professional Education is one of the many academic units of Georgia Tech, serving more than 36,000 learners globally. Georgia Tech is one of the top 10 universities in the US.

Why Drupal was chosen:
  • Its ability to integrate with various third-party marketing and communication tools.
  • Data security to protect student information.
  • Improved performance with smart caching.
  • To provide a user-friendly, easy to navigate and access website.
  6. UChicago News

The University of Chicago News office focuses on publishing new content ranging from student academic information to current affairs. They publish over 1000 stories every year that are later picked up and published by other media and publishing firms.

Why Drupal was chosen:
  • To improve website performance and speed during peak traffic events.
  • Powerful and smooth migration of their heavy websites with over 20,000 content nodes and over 10,000 taxonomy terms.
  • To be able to accommodate their growing number of pages, content types, and access control levels.
  • Easy creation and management of content with an effective workflow system in place.
  7. University of Minnesota

Founded in 1851, this top university has more than 50,000 students enrolled in its programs. University of Minnesota is one of the very few universities that can boast about having a medical school, an engineering school, a law school, an agricultural school, and a veterinary school – all in one campus! They had 600 sites that needed to be migrated to Drupal, each of them heavy in terms of storage size with millions of monthly visitors.

Why Drupal was chosen:
  • They needed a flexible CMS that could handle their humungous number of visitors and content with ease.
  • To be able to quickly create new sites from standard design and features – using Drupal install profiles.
  • To build a centrally maintained, yet independently distributed platform that can be used across departments, satellite campuses, organizations, staff, etc.
  • To offer a secure platform with an extremely low tolerance for failure.

 

Information is available on our fingertips today and it has become more important than ever to stay relevant and provide the right information at the right time. Educational institutes are no different when it comes to showcasing content to a wide range of audience. Creating a digital strategy and using the right platform is vital for these institutes’ survival. Drupal has proven time and again to be the top choice of CMS for educational institutes – ranging from universities to Ivy league schools to higher ed schools. With features like intuitive content management abilities, web accessibility, multisite approach, responsive design, seamless third-party integrations and more, no wonder Drupal is the number one choice for education institutes

Contact us today to know how our Drupal experts can help you with your next Drupal project. We’d love to hear from you!

Drupal Planet Drupal Development Drupal Drupal Module Shefali ShettyApr 05, 2017 Subscribe For Our Newsletter And Stay Updated Subscribe

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DrupalEasy: Understanding common cache-related HTTP response headers

Main Drupal Feed - 8 hours 59 min ago

Having a basic understanding of caching is a requirement of being a professional Drupal developer. Unfortunately, there can be many layers of caching which can make it challenging to figure out exactly how best to configure cache settings and troubleshoot potential caching issues.

Web page caching can be thought of as moats around the castle, where each moat is a caching layer and the castle can be thought of as the site's web, database, and other origin servers.

HTTP headers provide a mechanism for the client (usually a web browser) and a server (usually a web server) to exchange information that is not visible to the end user, nor included in the HTML of the page. While there are few types of headers, cache-related headers are generally "response headers".

This blog post isn't meant to be a comprehensive guide to all layers of web page caching, rather we'll focused on common, cache-related HTTP response headers. Information in these response headers can help developers identify which caching layers, if any, were utilized in a given page request. Specifically, we'll be looking at how to view this response header information, and what it can tell us about Drupal page caching and content delivery network (CDN) caching activity on a per-request basis.

Keep in mind that there is not a constrained list of headers that can be added to a page request or response. While there is a common set defined by the Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA) additional proprietary (custom) headers can be added by developers and vendors. It is also important to note that header names are case-insensitive, so the header names "Cache-Control" and "cache-control" are equivalent.

Instructions for viewing cache-related HTTP headers is included at the bottom of this article.

Categories of cache-related response headers

Cache-related response headers can be categorized as either "standard" or "proprietary". Standard headers are those defined by IANA while proprietary headers are added by developers and vendors. Below is a sample of some of the commonly-used cache-related response headers:

Standard (non-proprietary) cache-related response headers
  • Age: the time (seconds) that the object (file) has been cached.
  • Cache-control: general directives for caching mechanisms. For example, if this is set to "no-cache", then the file won't be cached.
  • Expires: the date/time after which the response will be considered stale, and then refreshed from the source. For Drupal sites, by default, this value is set to Dries Buytaert's birth date.
Common proprietary response headers

Again, these are not industry-standard response headers, and different vendors (hosting companies, content delivery networks) may have different implementations. It is best to refer to your specific vendor's documentation for additional details.

  • x-drupal-cache: Drupal-specific header set by Drupal core, values include "HIT", "MISS", and "UNCACHEABLE". Provided by the core Internal Page Cache module, applies only to anonymous users.
  • x-drupal-dynamic-cache: Drupal-specific header set by Drupal core, values include "HIT", "MISS", and "UNCACHEABLE". Provided by the core Internal Dynamic Page Cache module, applies to both anonymous and authenticated users. Allows for partial responses. See blog post by Wim Leers for more information.
  • x-served-by: this header is added by various tools to (normally) indicate the server that provided the response. This includes some (but not all) hosting companies and content delivery networks.
  • x-cache: in general, this indicates if the file was served by a CDN or the origin server. Multiple x-cache values often correspond to multiple "x-served-by" values.
  • x-cache-hits: for some CDNs, this value closely mirrors the "x-cache" value, only with a value of "0" being equivalent to "MISS" and any positive value equivalent to a "HIT" (the value being equal to the number of tries before a hit).
  • cf-cache-status: set by Cloudflare CDN, indicates the status of a cache request. Values include "HIT", "MISS", "DYNAMIC", "EXPIRED", and others. Note that in its default configuration, Cloudflare will not cache HTML - only things like static images.
  • cf-ray, cf-request-id: set by Cloudflare CDN to help trace requests through the Cloudflare network. Used for troubleshooting.

At this point, it is important to note an important difference between two of the more widely-used content delivery networks, Fastly and Cloudflare. Fastly is primarily a content delivery network built on top of the Varnish web application accelerator. While Fastly does have some web application firewall (WAF) capabilities, Cloudflare is both a content delivery network and a full, security-focused web application firewall provider. In some cases (including for DrupalEasy.com), both Fastly and Cloudflare can be used - Fastly for its CDN and Cloudflare for its WAF.

Examples

Below are a couple of examples of cache-related response headers along with a short discussion about what they mean.

Drupal.org cache-related response header values for HTML page Authenticated user

Cache-Control: no-cache, must-revalidate x-served-by: cache-sea4481-SEA, cache-mia11376-MIA x-cache-hits: 0, 0 x-cache: MISS, MISS

Non-cached page served from the drupal.org "origin server" (located at Oregon State University) due to the "Cache-Control" value.

The "x-cache" values indicate that for authenticated users, Drupal.org's CDN (Fastly) did not serve the page. The first "x-served-by" value is the Fastly server closest to the origin server, while the second value is the Fastly server closest to the user loading the page. While "x-cache" indicates that a cached version of the page was not used, it was Fastly's servers that initially processed the request and ultimately retrieved the page from the origin server.

Anonymous user

Cache-Control: public, max-age=900 x-drupal-cache: MISS x-served-by: cache-sea4420-SEA, cache-mia11369-MIA x-cache-hits: 1, 4 x-cache: HIT, HIT

The "Cache-Control" value provided by the origin server indicates that the page can be cached for up to 900 seconds (15 minutes). The "x-cache" values indicate that the cached page was served by the Fastly server closest to the user ("cache-mia11369-MIA" in this example).

DrupalEasy.com cache-related response header values for HTML page Authenticated user

Cache-Control: no-cache x-served-by: cache-mdw17368-MDW, cache-mia11364-MIA x-drupal-dynamic-cache: UNCACHEABLE x-cache-hits: 0, 0 x-cache: MISS, MISS cf-cache-status: DYNAMIC

DrupalEasy is hosted on Pantheon (which includes the Fastly CDN) and uses the Cloudflare CDN. The "x-cache" values indicate that for authenticated users, Pantheon's default CDN (Fastly) did not serve the page. The first "x-served-by" value is the Fastly server close to the origin, while the second value is the Fastly server close to the user loading the page. While "x-cache" indicates that a cached version of the page was not used, it was Fastly's servers that processed the request and ultimately retrieved the page from the origin (Pantheon) server.

The "cf-cache-status" of "DYNAMIC" indicates that the file is not eligible for caching by Cloudflare. This is normally a result of a directive from the origin server to never cache the file ("Cache-Control: no-cache").

Anonymous user

cache-control: max-age=60, public x-served-by: cache-mdw17325-MDW, cache-mia11383-MIA x-drupal-cache: HIT x-drupal-dynamic-cache: MISS x-cache-hits: 0, 1 x-cache: MISS, HIT cf-request-id: 0775a92a710000e958291b2000000001 cf-ray: 60cfaaf0aa52e958-MIA cf-cache-status: DYNAMIC

For an anonymous user, the "x-cache" value of "MISS, HIT" indicates that the 2nd "x-served-by" value (the Fastly server close to the user) provided a cached response.

DrupalEasy.com cache-related response header values for image (site logo) Anonymous and authenticated users

Cache-Control: max-age=31622400 Expires: Fri, 31 Dec 2021 17:54:40 GMT x-served-by: cache-mdw17349-MDW, cache-mia11320-MIA x-cache-hits: 1, 1 x-cache: HIT, HIT cf-cache-status: HIT

The "cf-cache-status" value of "HIT" indicates that Cloudflare served this image. The "Cache-Control" value indicates that the image can be cached for up to 3162240 seconds (< 36 days). Note that the image was cached every step of the way on both Fastly and Cloudflare.

Manually "bust" the cache

During development, sometimes it is necessary to "bust" the cache - that is, to request an uncached version of the content. While this can be done by clearing/purging/rebuilding caches at every level of the site's infrastructure (Drupal, Fastly, Cloudflare), it can also be done by adding a unique querystring variable to the content as they are cached according to their unique URL, including querystring variables. So, if you want to request an uncached version of "logo.png", simply append a meaningless querystring variable to it - for example, "logo.png?buster=2358973430985234895".

Summary

As the previous examples show, in order to be able to make sense of cache-related response headers, it is important to know which, if any CDNs are being used as well as which, if any, Drupal-level caching modules are enabled.

Resources Viewing cache-related HTTP headers

All major browsers provide relatively easy access to HTTP header information, if you know where to look. Here's a quick guide:

Safari
  • Open Web Inspector ("Inspect Element" anywhere)
  • Go to "Network" tab.
  • Reload page.
  • Click on (usually) first entry in list of files - this will be the main HTML file for the page.
  • Click on the "Headers" sub-tab.
Firefox
  • Open the network tools via the "Tools|Web Developer|Network" menu item.
  • Reload page.
  • Click on (usually) first entry in list of files - this will be the main HTML file for the page.
  • Click on the "Headers" sub-tab.
Chrome
  • Open the network tools via the "View|Developer|Developer Tools" menu item.
  • Go to "Network" tab.
  • Reload page.
  • Click on (usually) first entry in list of files - this will be the main HTML file for the page.
  • Click on the "Headers" sub-tab.

Edge
  • Open Developer Tools (Crtl-Shift-I).
  • Go to "Network" tab.
  • Reload page.
  • Click on (usually) first entry in list of files - this will be the main HTML file for the page.
  • Click on the "Headers" sub-tab.

Thanks to Andy Giles from Blue Oak Interactive for reviewing this blog post.

Promet Source: Documenting Web Accessibility: Do You Need a VPAT?

Main Drupal Feed - 10 hours 25 min ago
It has become increasingly common to find located in the footer of many websites a link to their Statement of Accessibility. In a few cases you will find some sites with a VPAT (Voluntary Product Accessibility Template) and Statement of Accessibility linked. What are these documents? What is their purpose and should your site have one or both?   

Community Working Group posts: Encouraging healthy conversations in the Drupal community

Main Drupal Feed - Mon, 01/25/2021 - 15:11

If you've spent any time in the Drupal community (specifically the issue queues, forums, and Drupal Slack workspace channels), you may have noticed that while the vast majority of discussions are positive, every now and then tempers flare up or less-than-helpful comments are posted. 

To continue to grow a healthy community, we all must work under the assumption that no one intentionally uses language to hurt others. Even so, despite our best efforts we sometimes still use words or phrases that are discouraging, harmful, or offensive to others. We are all human beings who make mistakes, but as members of a shared community, it’s our responsibility to lift each other up and encourage the best in each other. 

When observing negative behavior in the Drupal community, it can be difficult and/or uncomfortable to interject ourselves and find the right words to get conversations moving in a healthy direction. To address this, starting with an idea discussed at a Community Working Group (CWG) workshop at DrupalCon Seattle, the CWG Community Health team has been working on a communication initiative for the Drupal community. It consists of a series of de-escalation templates we have dubbed “Nudges”.

“Nudges”

The team has written five nudges that community members can use when they are faced with one of these uncomfortable situations in the Drupal community. We selected topics that we feel can have the most impact and are easy to understand. Each “nudge” provides context as to why the comment may be harmful and relevant links including our Code of Conduct and Values and Principles.

The “nudges” created to date are as follows:

Inclusive language - gendered terms

This discussion appears to include the use of gendered language in a comment. Gendered language can be harmful to our community because it can signal that we assume that people’s participation in the community is determined by gender.

The shift to gender-neutral language promotes gender equality. Please respect the pronouns that community members provide in their profiles.

For more information, please refer to Drupal’s Values and Principles about treating each other with dignity and respect.

This comment is provided as a service (currently being tested) of the Drupal Community Health Team as part of a project to encourage all participants to engage in positive discourse. For more information, please visit https://www.drupal.org/project/drupal_cwg/issues/3129687

Inclusive language - ableist terms

This discussion appears to include the use of ableist language in a comment. Ableist language can be harmful to our community because it can devalue challenges experienced by people with disabilities.

For more information, please refer to Drupal’s Values and Principles about treating each other with dignity and respect.

This comment is provided as a service (currently being tested) of the Drupal Community Health Team as part of a project to encourage all participants to engage in positive discourse. For more information, please visit https://www.drupal.org/project/drupal_cwg/issues/3129687

Gatekeeping knowledge

This discussion appears to discourage contribution from some participants by assuming a level of education or exposure to information. This can discourage folks that are new to a conversation from asking for help or getting involved. Consider providing the new contributor with links to help them learn the topic or concept.

For more information, please refer to Drupal’s Values and Principles #3 of fostering a learning environment: long-term contributors should be role models by admitting their own shortcomings and mistakes, being vulnerable, and by giving others the same respect that was once given to them. To keep learning read this article about not feigning surprise.

Principle #9 can also be useful here: be constructively honest, and relentlessly optimistic. You can be optimistic and supportive by giving suggestions for how to improve their contributions. By being helpful, you encourage people to accept feedback and act on it.

This comment is provided as a service (currently being tested) of the Drupal Community Health Team as part of a project to encourage all participants to engage in positive discourse. For more information, please visit https://www.drupal.org/project/drupal_cwg/issues/3129687

Cultural differences

This discussion appears to have escalated due to the inclusion of culturally-specific language. This may be harmful to our community as stereotypes can exclude or tokenize community members, devaluing their individual contribution and value. Please avoid language that imposes an identity on an individual or group.

We should be mindful that not all words and phrases translate to have the same meaning. Please be mindful that different cultures may appreciate different levels of directness in their communication styles and that may impact how words are presented or interpreted.

For more information, please refer to Drupal’s Values and Principles about treating each other with dignity and respect.

This comment is provided as a service (currently being tested) of the Drupal Community Health Team as part of a project to encourage all participants to engage in positive discourse. For more information, please visit https://www.drupal.org/project/drupal_cwg/issues/3129687

Escalating emotions

This discussion appears to include escalating emotions, creating the opportunity for miscommunication. The invested parties are encouraged to take a break from this discussion to help gain perspective. It is important to the community that all members are shown the appropriate amount of respect and openness when working together. Additionally, there are resources offered by the Drupal community to aid conflict resolution should those be needed.

For more information, please refer to Drupal’s Values and Principles of seeking first to understand, then to be understood. Assume best intentions of other contributors and suspend judgment until you have invested time to understand decisions, ask questions, and listen. Before expressing a disagreement, make a serious attempt to understand the reasons behind the decision.

This comment is provided as a service (currently being tested) of the Drupal Community Health Team as part of a project to encourage all participants to engage in positive discourse. For more information, please visit https://www.drupal.org/project/drupal_cwg/issues/3129687

Testing strategy

Over the next few months, members of the Community Health Team will be testing these "nudges” in Drupal.org issue queues, forums, and Drupal Slack workspace channels. For now, this will be done by copying and pasting the nudge text and formatting directly into an issue comment or Slack message. Our goal is to create a nudge widget that allows community members to insert one of the pre-written nudges via a token in issue queue and forum comments.

We feel that a gradual introduction to help prevent overuse of these nudges is necessary as overuse may produce its own sort of gatekeeping. This could lead to desensitization to the “nudge” initiative, negating our efforts. The CWG’s mission is to ensure a positive space that is inclusive to all of our members. 

These are early days for “nudges”. We are looking forward to hearing from other community members on how we can improve on this idea. We have been having weekly meetings for nudges and have been documenting everything we've been doing in the Community Working Group issue queue - let us know if you'd like to get involved!

Thanks

Current community members who have been working on this task include: AmyJune Hineline (volkswagenchick), Neil Drumm (drumm), George Matthes (watsonerror), Darren Oh, Donna Bungard, JD Flynn (dorficus), George DeMet, and Mike Anello (ultimike).
 

CTI Digital: [Video] Digital challenges faced by UK Universities

Main Drupal Feed - Mon, 01/25/2021 - 09:15

Newly engineered opportunities have opened the doors for Higher Education institutions to pioneer student, researcher, and funding recruitment. From deeper data applications to mass-scale live debates, the Higher Education sector is going through a digital transformation, with varying rates and approaches.

New data and accessibility regulations, as well as pressure on student recruitment from COVID-19, have required Higher Education institutions to accelerate these 'digital transformation roadmaps'.

DrupalEasy: Get more out of Address fields with Address Map (& Directions) Link module

Main Drupal Feed - Mon, 01/25/2021 - 09:00

If you're like most modern Drupal developers, you use the excellent Address module to collect country-aware address data on entities that require it. But, what do you do with the output of address data?

Granted, you can use the Geofield module ecosystem to turn that address data into embedded maps on your site, but if you're looking for a simpler solution, consider using the Address Map (& Directions) Link module - this module does one thing and does it well: it allows you to link the address to an external mapping service of your choice via additional settings on the default Address formatter.

So, the next time you use the Address field, consider this easy solution to improve the usefulness of that data!

OpenSense Labs: Can the Drupal and Angular partnership benefit you?

Main Drupal Feed - Fri, 01/22/2021 - 12:53
Can the Drupal and Angular partnership benefit you? Gurpreet Kaur Fri, 01/22/2021 - 18:23

The way websites are perceived has changed a lot recently. The audience has started demanding more and more from the web and web developers have to provide for all the demands. What this has resulted in is the transformation of websites for the better. 

The features that today’s sites are packed with were hardly even imaginable a decade ago. A website, a web application or a mobile application, all can do wonders for the users, satiating them with their experiences. 

So, when building a website, you have to be extremely considerate of the software you use and the technologies that accompany it as it is these that will make an astounding difference in your site’s overall appeal. 

On the same note, I will try to enlighten you about one such software and technology pair that has made websites as appealing as both their developers and users want them to be, and that is Drupal and Angular. So, let’s get right on it.

Drupal’s Essence 

In essence, Drupal is a provider of innovative digital experiences that set your websites apart from the ordinary. 

Being a content management software, Drupal can make websites that actually set standards for others to follow. Convenient content authoring, impeccable performance and outstanding security are some of Drupal’s most renowned features. Whether you want flexibility and modularity or integrated digital frameworks, Drupal can ease your needs. 

With multiple add-ons;
With numerous modules; 
With several themes; 
With various distributions; 
And with multitudinal mix and match options, Drupal’s core abilities are magnified by a landslide. 

Now, the Drupal 9 has paved the way for an even more delightful web building experience. Known to be the easiest upgrade in over a decade, it is going to take Drupal 8’s innovative streak even further. Here’s everything you will want to know about Drupal 9.

NBC, MTV UK, Amnesty International and University of Oxford are some of the elite clientele of Drupal and their websites are a true epitome of Drupal’s abilities. 

Make something amazing, for anyone”  - a motto of a kind should have been pretty self explanatory of Drupal’s essence, but it has acquired bragging rights and rightfully so. Hence, a little more elaborated boasting was mandatory.  

Taking the Headless Route 

Drupal’s abilities, features and all that it encompasses has made it one of a kind. At the top of the list of its unique abilities is its ‘headlessness’. I know this is going to sound strange, but it is a fact and a very beneficial one at that. 

Like I mentioned above, Drupal has all the features to make a web experience up and running and quite smoothly too. Having so many modules, themes and distributions, web builders would not find any need to look for additional features in their site. The entire web project would be placed inside Drupal and it would be entirely responsible for all of the project's needs. 

However, sometimes developers want to try more and Drupal lets them. It essentially removes its head, that is the presentation layer, to make room for a different one, that is other frontend technologies, and lets the developers only utilise it for its body, that would be its backend capabilities. So, in a truly Headless Drupal architecture, you would only use Drupal as a content repository and nothing else. This is also known as Decoupled Drupal, since you are going to be separating the couple, the frontend from the backend. 

When you go headless, you will be parting with Drupal’s frontend capabilities, but the separation does not have to be final. Decoupled Drupal comes with two options for you to choose from; 

  • One is the fully decoupled Drupal or the Headless Drupal. This completely segregates the two ends of a web project. Drupal takes command of the backend, while other frontend technologies, like JavaScript take hold of the frontend; both being connected by an API for the transmission of the information. 
  • Then there is the less final, progressively decoupled Drupal. In this architecture, you are still left with some of Drupal’s frontend capabilities. This means you can combine other frontend technologies to work with Drupal and get the most for your website, without losing Drupal out-of-the-box capabilities.  
Do you benefit from the going Headless?

Drupal has numerous benefits when you use it as a whole for building projects from the ground up; however, the decoupled Drupal comes with a tad more advantages. That is why it is becoming a vogue today, with several traditional Drupal sites converting themselves into the decoupled ones. 

So, yes, you will indeed benefit from taking the headless route. 

Aids in publishing on multiple platforms 

Going Headless makes it very easy to publish content on multiple platforms, be it your primary website, social media handles, intra sites or even print and media. The write once, publish everywhere features lets you capitalise all the IOT devices and publish on them.

Aids in maximising user experience 

The growth of your online business is directly proportional to the user experience you provide. The better the UX, the higher the conversions. UX is further dependent on your site’s performance. Having two separate ends enhances it, the request time is reduced with a client-side server and your site would be nothing but speedy.

Aids in making your team independent 

When you have a separated front and backend, that means you have the power to work faster. The frontend developers will only be focused on the user interface and the backend developers will only need to worry about those needs. Your teams can even make changes on their respective layers without having to worry about impeding the work of the other. All of this results in faster work speed and increased efficiency.  

Aids in enhancing creativity 

Drupal is a robust software, yet it can be stuff sometimes. You have to follow its guidelines and set standards or the work won’t get done. This hampers the development team’s creative flair. However, by adopting other, more flexible, frontend technologies through decoupling, you can let your creativity run free. 

Aids in faster upgrades 

Headless Drupal separation of concerns makes it simple to upgrade without impeding on your site’s current workings. It also gives you the opportunity to test on a dummy web service, which acts as a mockup, aiding you further in making revisions to your site.

Aids in taking advantage of JavaScript 

The final and probably the most compelling advantage of decoupled Drupal is the use of JavaScript. JS has the ability to make websites extremely interactive, with features like destructed assignment and arrow functions in the latest version. Since site interactivity with the user has taken precedence over anything else, decoupling has become more of a need. React, Angular and Vue are some of the most eminent JS frameworks that are used when going Headless. 

To know everything about headless Drupal and its suitability, read our blog, “When to move from monolithic to decoupled Drupal architecture.”

In Comes AngularJS

Now that we have discussed one part of the title, let’s move on to the second, which is AngularJS. You may know that a major reason behind going headless is the fact that it allows the user to incorporate other frontend technologies into Drupal and get the desired web building experience and the product as well. AngularJS is one such technology. Let’s get into its details.

What is AngularJS?

We ended the headless Drupal discussion at JavaScript, so it is only wise to begin the new one with JavaScript as well. AngularJS operates on JavaScript, being an open-source front-end web framework. It helps you create dynamic web pages through its structured framework. 

HTML’s template language is integral when building web projects. However, there is one problem with its use. HTML has proven its potential for static documents, however, when dynamic views come to play, it becomes lacklustre and chaotic. Now, in such a scenario, AngularJS comes in to save you. It allows you to extend the HTML vocabulary for your project, paving way for your developers to work in an environment that is expressive, readable and fast to develop. 

There aren’t many frameworks that have the ability to solve the HTML conundrum, what they do instead is abstract away HTML, CSS and JS or they might manipulate the DOM. covering up the problem is not really a solution and AngularJS provides an extension of HTML, making it worthy for dynamic views. 

The crowning jewel of AngularJS is its ability to adapt. It can easily be modified or replaced to make it suitable for any of your development needs. Whatever your workflow and feature require, AngularJS has the ability to provide. The fact that it is completely extensive and compatible with other libraries. 

Talking about the technologies Angular belongs to, it is part of the so-called MEAN stack. The MEAN refers to MangoDB, Express, Angular and Node.js. The combination of these four accounts for a firm ecosystem that is also backed by full-stack developers.

Let's look at AngularJS’ market share to understand its prominence even more. 

(a)

 

(b)

 

(c) | Source: SimilarTech

All of these numbers are pretty self-explanatory of AngularJS’ popularity in the market. 

What are the benefits?

Built in 2010 by Google, which is to this date responsible for its maintenance along with an entire community of developers and companies, AngularJS is quite a technology to utilise for your project’s development. It’s numerous benefits will make you believe me even more. 

Angular is flexible 

Angular by nature, or maybe its build, is extremely lightweight and concise. What this translates into is a working environment that is so extensible that you would be able to create things you never deemed possible. 

Angular uses directives 

Like we discussed above, Angular is unique because it is able to extend HTML. And this is possible because of Directives. Through these, special behaviours are assigned to the Document Object Model, which in turn enables your developers and engineers to use HTML and create dynamic and rich content. 

Angular binds your data two ways 

It is a known fact that Angular gives your developers the power of developing at a much faster rate. Multiple views, asynchronous technique, SEO friendly development are amongst a few of the immensely impressive features of Angular. And all these are possible because it works on the MVC architecture.  Because the Model-View-Controller framework synchronises the Model and the View, so when one changes, the other changes automatically. And work gets done faster. 

Angular injects dependencies 

When developers code, all the different pieces of that code have to interact with each other. This interaction also means that they are going to be affected by each other;s changes. This scenario is defined as dependencies. 

AngularJS solves this issue of dependencies in code simply by decoupling them using injectors. A dependency injector has the ability of making individual components easy to manage, test and reuse; maybe even more than before. 

Angular aids testing 

Lastly, AngularJS also makes unit testing pretty convenient for you. It has a built-in setup that makes testing the code much simpler and faster for your developers. 

The things you can do using AngularJS are much more advanced than Drupal’s frontend capabilities. So, combining the two is going to be a partnership that will make work wonders for your web project. 

The best of both worlds

Up until now we have been talking Decoupled Drupal and Angular individually and they have certainly been impressive enough. Both Drupal and Angular are equipped to build projects that will cater to any and all of your needs.

When paired together, they seem to be packing a punch. Your web projects will be able to accomplish so much more. Let’s have a look at some of the most intriguing features.  

Performance that will leave you spellbound 

A site’s performance is what sets it apart from others, it is what will keep your visitors scrolling through your pages and finally clicking on that coveted Buy Now tab. So, how do Drupal and Angular together help in improving your site’s performance?

If I talk about Drupal, it provides functionality in tons. Just working with drupal can make your site perform impeccably. Now, if you combine the Angular technology with it, you will end up with a performance that would be even better. That is because you will be able to offload business logic to AngularJS as it is client-side, you would not be able to do it completely, but even some part of the offload can be extremely effective. 

Furthermore, when you go Headless and take up Angular, you would use the latter for theming and presentation, while Drupal would only be responsible for the backend data source. This would enable you to move the display logic to the client-side, helping you in streamlining the backend. The resultant site is going to end up as fast as The Flash himself, for lack of a better metaphor.

Coding that will free up your developers 

When you use Drupal to build a regular, basic website, you would not need to write a lot of code and the development work would also be quite minimal. Yes, a basic Drupal site would not be feature packed and that is where AngularJS would enter. 

AngularJS will take an ordinary Drupal site and make it extraordinary, so to speak. Angular can make sites more interactive, more dynamic and richer in experience, and complex coding would not be a prominent part of this picture. 

By using directives, HTML, plain objects and other features, the JS framework requires very little effort from your developers in terms of coding. Despite the minimal efforts, you will still end up with the interactive pages that were only possible to get with a complete JS coding. 

Logic that will clean up your code structure 

You remember we talked about the MVC architecture in the previous section? I would have to be redundant and mention it again since it serves a lot of benefits when going headless. 

The Model-View-Controller architecture works on a principle that essentially segregates itself into three parts; 

Business logic;
Controller logic; 
And model logic. 

This results in a separation of your application logic from the user interface. And why is that essential? Because it aids in making the code structure cleaner, without much redundancy and more clarity. 

Imagine if one of your developers has to leave in the middle of your project. This could become devastating for your project, but an isolated code would make it extremely convenient for any other developer to pick up the left pieces and continue with the same effectiveness as before. 

AngularJS and Drupal also work well together because the MVC framework helps in eliminating a lot of backend logic from Drupal. Consequently, your site will turn out to be both extremely lightweight and efficient.

Security that will keep you shielded

Both Drupal and Angular are backed by a massive community. This means that there all the security features are always under scrutiny and the chance of things going sideways is slim to none. 

Add to this the fact the Drupal’s security protocol, if followed to the T will provide you an assurance of safety that not many CMSs can. Further adding to this, the combination of Headless Drupal and AngularJS will enable an extra layer of security to your site because there won't be any direct server-side interaction, the browser will only communicate with AngularJS.

The result of all of this would be that your site will become immune to malicious code that the notorious hackers are known to inject in your databases. And all would be well in the web world.

Everything about leveraging decoupled Drupal and different frontend technologies can be accessed here

Summing Up 

When decoupling is considered, tapping into the available frontend technologies is the paramount concern. JavaScript is most definitely at the forefront of the developers’ mind for the presentation layers. 

Angular is one of the flag bearers of JavaScript, and Drupal is a prominent name in the CMS world. Be it dynamic sites or interactive interfaces, the possibilities of with the combination of these two powerhouses. So, when are you taking them up?

blog banner blog image Drupal Angular Decoupled Drupal Headless Drupal Frontend technologies Blog Type Articles Is it a good read ? On

DrupalCon News: Submit your interest to serve on a DrupalCon committee

Main Drupal Feed - Thu, 01/21/2021 - 20:04

DrupalCon is enhanced through the time and talent contributed by volunteers, and we offer a number of opportunities to influence and support the design and implementation of the event. We’ve put together an overview of the volunteer opportunities for your review and consideration. If one or more of the roles aligns with your interests and availability, submit your interest form.

Drupal.org blog: A Non-Code Community Contribution Opportunity: Become a Site Moderator

Main Drupal Feed - Thu, 01/21/2021 - 18:28

Our community is in need of additional drupal.org site moderators (formerly "webmasters") to assist day-to-day site moderation tasks.

Over the past few years, the number of active site moderators in the Drupal.org site moderators queue https://www.drupal.org/project/issues/site_moderators?categories=All has decreased significantly. Recognizing that this isn't a sustainable situation, the current active site moderators have embarked on an effort to recruit new volunteers.

Responsibilities of a site moderator

Site moderators are primarily tasked with responding to issues in the Drupal.org site moderators issue queue and the ongoing on-boarding of new community members. These tasks include:

  • Responding to issues in the Drupal.org site moderators issue queue.
  • Reviewing posts flagged as spam, deleting spam, and blocking users who post spam on Drupal.org web sites.
  • Confirming new Drupal.org users.
  • Responding to reports of projects posted on Drupal.org that do not meet community norms.
  • Other related tasks as described on the Moderation and maintenance documentation page https://www.drupal.org/drupalorg/docs/maintenance.
Process to become a site moderator

In order to become a site moderator, there are a few easy steps:

  1. Familiarize yourself with site moderator responsibilities via the project https://www.drupal.org/project/site_moderators and the Site Moderator role description. https://www.drupal.org/community/contributor-guide/role/drupalorg-site_moderators
  2. Announce your intent to start participating in the #drupalorg-site-moderators channel in the Drupal Slack workspace.
  3. Begin participating in site moderator issues https://www.drupal.org/project/issues/site_moderators?categories=All - it is recommended that at first you ask questions and propose solutions to issues in a way that current site moderators can provide useful feedback.
  4. Once you have participated in the site moderator issue queue enough that you feel that you have a good handle on its various processes, open a new issue in the queue asking for the Drupal.org "site administrator" role. It is highly recommended that you are active in the issue queue and Drupal Slack workspace channel, and have interacted with the other active site maintainers before applying for this elevated role.
Why donate your time to Drupal?

If you've made it this far, then the obvious question is "why should I become a Drupal.org site moderator?" Develop and exercise your people-skills while helping the Drupal community become a more sustainable, welcoming, friendly, and productive place. Regardless if you’re a developer, becoming a site moderator is a pretty straightforward way to build those skills.

In addition:

  • You'll work with other site moderators around the globe, building up your Drupal community network.
  • You'll have the opportunity to help nurture new community members in a meaningful way.
  • You'll have the opportunity to earn contribution credits.
  • Having the "site moderator" role is a position of leadership in our community. https://www.drupal.org/about/values-and-principles#choose-to-lead
  • If you or your organization uses Drupal and is looking for a way to give back, this is a small thing that will have a big impact.
First step

Interested? If you have any questions, pop into the Drupal Slack workspace #drupalorg channel and ask away. When you're ready, start with steps 1 and 2 above and start your journey!

Thanks to Donna Bungard (dbungard https://www.drupal.org/u/dbungard), Darren Oh (https://www.drupal.org/u/darren-oh), Jordana Fung ( jordana https://www.drupal.org/u/jordana), and Mike Anello (ultimike https://www.drupal.org/u/ultimike) for assisting with this blog post. 

Innoraft Drupal Blogs: UNDERSTANDING THE MOBILE APP DEVELOPMENT LIFECYCLE

Main Drupal Feed - Thu, 01/21/2021 - 17:56
UNDERSTANDING THE MOBILE APP DEVELOPMENT LIFECYCLE

Mobile app development is not rocket science in today's day and age. Making a good mobile application, however, is a process that requires a very lengthy pre-planning process. It could be as simple as launching the IDE, putting a few items together, doing a quick round of screening, and uploading it to an App Store, all achieved in half a day's work, to create your mobile application. Or you can render it a deeply engaged process involving comprehensive up-front design, QA testing on a range of platforms, accessibility testing, a complete beta lifecycle, and then various forms of deploying it. Your vision is given form by the direction you chose.

souvik Thu, 01/21/2021 - 23:26 Drupal Planet Drupal 7 Drupal 8 user friendly website Web Design website development services web developers

Nonprofit Drupal posts: January Drupal for Nonprofits Chat

Main Drupal Feed - Thu, 01/21/2021 - 15:25

Our normally scheduled call to chat about all things Drupal and nonprofits will happen TODAY, Thursday, January 21, at 1pm ET / 10am PT. (Convert to your local time zone.)

No set agenda this month, so we'll have plenty of time to discuss whatever Drupal-related thoughts are on your mind. 

All nonprofit Drupal devs and users, regardless of experience level, are always welcome on this call.

Feel free to share your thoughts and discussion points ahead of time in our collaborative Google doc: https://nten.org/drupal/notes

This free call is sponsored by NTEN.org and open to everyone.

View notes of previous months' calls.

Mediacurrent: Drupal Paragraphs: The Bridge to Better Content Architecture

Main Drupal Feed - Thu, 01/21/2021 - 13:35
Problem: The Power (and Pitfall) of Paragraphs

With great content modeling powers comes great responsibility for Drupal developers. 

While building a website, you may face the challenge of creating multiple paragraphs without much reuse. This can contribute to a poor content architecture that will burden you for the lifetime of your application. This issue can come about when a developer is building out paragraphs and decides to generate multiple paragraphs with similar fields or new fields that perform the same functionality as other fields. 

For example, let’s say a developer is tasked with building a normal Text Paragraph which is just one textarea field, which is simple enough. Now, let’s say a client comes to that developer and ask if the Text Paragraph could have a header field, and a subheader field. Usually, a developer might decide to just create a new paragraph, maybe call it a Card Paragraph, that has a new header field, subheader field, and a new body field. Well, what if you could just reuse the body field from the Text Paragraph? There is a way to do that by using Form Displays and the default Paragraphs reference field widget. Of course, the example above is simple, but there might be better cases which will be explained below.

Solution: Reuse Paragraphs and Form Displays

Mediacurrent’s Rain CMS  is an open source project that comes bundled with ready-to-use content types and paragraphs. One of those is the Card paragraph. The Card paragraph by itself might just have a title, media, body, and layout field. This is pretty useful as its own componentized item that can be reused on other components. Now let’s say you have another paragraph that is called a Breaker, which essentially is almost like a Card Paragraph but might have some variation. This Breaker paragraph might reuse the same title, body, but also has an extra field called right body for any text that might need to be put on the right column.

The way one can keep reusing the Card paragraphs, with other paragraphs that get created in the future is to add more fields onto the Card paragraph itself.

As displayed above we have a ton of fields added on to the Card Paragraph. One might say that why are you doing this, wouldn’t all these fields get displayed on the frontend. Technically yes at first, but there is a way to limit what fields get displayed on the Card paragraph itself and then a step on getting the Breaker paragraph to utilize the same fields coming from the Card paragraph.

This method is using what’s called view modes in the Form Display configuration. What you want to do is go into Managed Form Display in the CMS for the Card paragraph that you just created and take a look at what displays are available.

As you can see above we already have some displays created in the Rain distribution we are using. We have the Default, Breaker, Carousel, Column, Card Compound, and Overlay Breaker. These are all Form Display’s which are used for other Paragraph variations. 

Creating a new display is easy; you want to go to the bottom under the Default view mode and hit Custom Display Settings, which should drop down the above selection. As displayed in the screenshot there are some that are enabled and disabled. You can create a new one by clicking Managed form modes.

Now that we sidetracked a bit and explained how view modes work and how they are created, let's dive back in and talk about how you can now create this Card variation paragraph which is called the Breaker. Since we have a display already enabled for the Breaker what you want to do is click on the Breaker and see what fields are enabled by default.

 

Shown above this has the title, body, and the new body right field which is technically still part of the Card Paragraph, but just using a different form display. If you compare this display with the default display you can see that different fields are enabled and disabled, which allows for flexibility for reusability. Now that we see that the fields needed for the Breaker have been created or enabled, let’s go create the Breaker paragraph.

We then add a description and say that this is a breaker that will have content with two columns. If you remember above we have a body field and a body right, this is used to create these two columns.

When creating your Breaker paragraph make sure to add all the fields that are unique to this breaker like Line Break, and Show Two Columns which have specific functionality for the Breaker, but you also want to create a Paragraph reference field called Card which will allow you to reference a Card.

So how do you get it so this Card field shows the fields that you want from the Card Paragraph? Well, that’s why we worked on using the view mode on the Form Display for the Card Paragraph. What you want to do is the following.

Under the Breaker paragraph go to the Managed Form Display. Then under the Card field, you can use any widget that has the Form Display mode available. This will allow you to use the Form Display mode option in the widget to target the right display mode you want to use from the Card. Select the Breaker display mode.

Once this is done, hit save.  Now what you should expect is that whenever you go to create a breaker and you use the card field it should show the fields that are specified on the Card Breaker view mode.

Building Paragraphs the Smart Way 

Now whenever you as a developer get tasked with building out a paragraph, make sure to ask yourself: What can I do to reuse fields and displays as much as possible? I hope this guide will help you to make smart decisions for a better content architecture going forward.

Innoraft Drupal Blogs: ENTERPRISE WEBSITE DEVELOPMENT

Main Drupal Feed - Thu, 01/21/2021 - 13:11
ENTERPRISE WEBSITE DEVELOPMENT

It's essential that companies have a presence online in the digitalised global economy. Enterprise web development is thus, naturally, an important opportunity for a company to achieve online exposure and enter a broader audience. Web creation for business is essentially the method of creating a company-level website.
Enterprises run the gamut from mid-sized to large-scale enterprises and institutions (governmental, for-profit or non-profit) to organizations and collectives (healthcare, education, philanthropy, or any other group with a common purpose or similar goals).

souvik Thu, 01/21/2021 - 18:41 Drupal Planet Drupal 7 Drupal 8 user friendly website Web Design website development services web developers

Dropsolid: DrupalCon 2020, the aftermath

Main Drupal Feed - Thu, 01/21/2021 - 13:08
21 Jan Els Knevels

“Tell me and I forget, teach me and I may remember, involve me and I learn.” Wise words of a man whose head still appears on the 100 dollar bills in America. With Benjamin Franklin’s thoughts in the back of our minds, Dropsolid heads to DrupalCon every year. With one primary goal: learning. Learning from and teaching to a fantastic Drupal community. Because only by knowing what is really alive in this community we can make Dropsolid the most successful Martech company, with a focus on Open DXP solutions with Drupal at its core. So we put our money where our mouth is and we went out to investigate. For several years now we’ve been launching a survey in which we donate 15 minutes of open source contribution time for every completed form to develop Drupal even further. But we also exchanged ideas with like minded visitors and we conducted interesting follow-up conversations with listeners of all our sessions. What we’ve learned from this? We’ll tell you all about it below!

 

         

What keeps a Drupal developer up at night?

 

Jamstack & Drupal, match made in heaven?

Developers, in our survey but also at DrupalCon, have put a huge focus on the integration between the new JAMstack world (Javascript, APIs & Markup) and Drupal itself. Drupal allows to push results directly to the browser. More and more we also see that components, built in React, Vue.js, Ember or Angular are taking over some of the responsibility here. To such an extent even that the Drupal core team has decided to build a react component for the menu in Drupal. In addition, concepts such as keeping Drupal 7, 8 and 9 up to date have also been discussed on several occasions with even the outlook of automatic updates being hugely beneficial!

 

Data is the new gold

Some developers are convinced that data is the new gold and this of course raises the concept of data ownership and the fear of being dependent on external vendors. There were a number of discussions at DrupalCon about how Drupal can deal with this and what standard privacy protection measures Drupal could take with new installations.

 

Rising star: DXP

What did come as a big surprise is that developers are not yet completely familiar with the concept of DXP. More than half of our surveyed developers said they had never heard of it. At Dropsolid, Drupal is a permanent pillar of content management in our DXP projects, and it has become our mission to put DXPs on the map!

 

Opportunities for Drupal developers in the future

From our research, the many conversations and responses to our sessions at DrupalCon, we noted that developers in general are less involved in the end-user experience and customer journeys of (potential) customers. They have a limited view on the different platforms a brand uses to connect with its customers and how exactly that happens. Not necessarily a problem? But also not that unimportant! Keeping the end goal in mind is important for every position in a company. The communication between the different departments runs smoother when this is clear to everyone, the noses are in the same direction and everyone speaks the same language. Just think of the gap between business and development: how do you get a concept really sharp without all departments having a clear view of the core objective?

It could be the perfect time, for you as a Drupal developer, to expand your horizon. If you, as a developer, have an overview of the end user's goal, show a healthy interest in the optimal customer experience for your client and understand the needs of this new market? Then you are already one giant step ahead. It’s precisely these profiles that fill the gaps in the current market and make big career opportunities possible.

 

3 things business owners can learn from this 
  1. A good connection between the different departments, in particular business and IT, is priceless and an absolute must for every company.
  2. The balance between customer experience and operational excellence has to be in harmony.
  3. A lot of agency owners are worried about the previously listed roadblocks, and yet there is an obvious solution that is emerging: a Digital Experience Platform (DXP).
DXP to the rescue

Introducing a DXP into your business offers solutions for many problems. But what exactly does it provide? We’ll dive in deeper below.

Advantage 1: your team works closer together

A DXP brings teams closer to each other because everyone is working on one and the same framework. The end user is put in the center and the needs, wishes and goals of each individual are fulfilled this way. Doing so, companies can easily create a safe, maintenance-friendly and digital environment that offers an excellent experience to the visitor. The various employees, both developers and marketeers, ensure an excellent experience by co-creating as a cohesive team and achieving the end result together. The involvement of both parties increases, which of course benefits the quality.

Advantage 2: increase of productivity

Increased productivity: among other things, the integration of Gitlab provides a boost in productivity. In this blog we dive deeper into this integration, we list the benefits and clarify with a short demo.

Read the blog Advantage 3: a DXP is very accessible

Turning Drupal into a DXP… Really, it sounds more difficult than it actually is. Even for mid sized enterprises, it’s very accessible. We are by your side the entire way and will get you started with a solid foundation so your company can enjoy all the benefits a DXP has to offer. And we promise, there are many! In this technical webinar, our CTO, Nick Veenhof, explains exactly how to get started.

Watch the replay DXP: an opportunity you can’t miss out on

In 2021, we're focusing even more on personalized, digital and progressive customer experiences. Mid-sized enterprises can also easily jump on that boat this year by turning their Drupal into a DXP. Not sure if your company is ready for this? Simply test it with our free trial. We’ll guide you, your company and your team from A to Z.

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Innoraft Drupal Blogs: Why Choose Drupal Over Any Other CMS?

Main Drupal Feed - Thu, 01/21/2021 - 13:00
Why Choose Drupal Over Any Other CMS?

The dilemma of choosing the more suitable CMS from a range of possible CMS options can be overwhelming.' is a major question that comes to mind when thinking forward towards development.

souvik Thu, 01/21/2021 - 18:30 Drupal Planet Drupal Development Drupal Drupal 7 Drupal 8 user friendly website Web Design website development services web developers

ADCI Solutions: Web design trends in 2021

Main Drupal Feed - Thu, 01/21/2021 - 09:17

New year, new web design trends. This means that it is time to start updating your Drupal websites. Don't panic, there are not many things that need to be changed or upgraded. Check our article on web visual and technological trends that will be popular for websites and mobile applications in 2021.

You can find the link here.

 

Security advisories: Drupal core - Critical - Third-party libraries - SA-CORE-2021-001

Main Drupal Feed - Wed, 01/20/2021 - 17:10
Project: Drupal coreDate: 2021-January-20Security risk: Critical 18∕25 AC:Complex/A:User/CI:All/II:All/E:Exploit/TD:UncommonVulnerability: Third-party librariesDescription: 

The Drupal project uses the pear Archive_Tar library, which has released a security update that impacts Drupal. For more information please see:

Exploits may be possible if Drupal is configured to allow .tar, .tar.gz, .bz2, or .tlz file uploads and processes them.

Solution: 

Install the latest version:

Versions of Drupal 8 prior to 8.9.x are end-of-life and do not receive security coverage.

Disable uploads of .tar, .tar.gz, .bz2, or .tlz files to mitigate the vulnerability.

Reported By: Fixed By: 

OpenSense Labs: Comparing web services implementations: REST vs JSON:API vs GraphQL

Main Drupal Feed - Wed, 01/20/2021 - 13:08
Comparing web services implementations: REST vs JSON:API vs GraphQL Gurpreet Kaur Wed, 01/20/2021 - 18:38

People today do not like to be confined, if I talk about development teams, they would hold up flags stating the same. Since development and innovation go hand in hand and constraint is the biggest enemy of innovation, you can’t tell me they are wrong to have that notion. 

Talking specifically about web developments, there are a lot of areas to explore and a lot of technologies to help you do that. So, why limit yourself, when you don't have to? Drupal has brought such an impressive trend forward that has simply satiated the developer’s desire for innovation and that is the headless approach

Unlike before, when your entire project had to be nestled inside one CMS, Drupal now gives you the opportunity to explore new technologies to your heart’s desire. This is possible because the presentation layer and the backend content become two separate entities. Drupal acts as the content repository and a frontend technology of your liking takes care of, of course, the frontend part of website architecture.

To provide a connection between the separated development aspects of the project, enters the API. An API layer is a necessity when going headless, because it transmits all the information from the front to the backend and vice-versa. 

And the three available APIs in Drupal, REST, JSON and GraphQL, are the reason behind me writing this blog. Although the purpose of all three is the same, they are quite different from one another. Today, we would be highlighting their meanings, their pros and cons and all the visible distinctions they have. So, let’s begin. 

Decoding the APIs 


REST, JSON and GraphQL bring in a similar outcome when they are used for decoupling Drupal. Yes, they are different too. And we would get into the difference between REST, JSON and GraphQL soon. Before that it is essential to understand their history, origin and what they were intended for because the differences actually start from there. 

REST 

REST was developed by Roy Fielding in the year 2000, the purpose behind its development was to provide a software architectural design for APIs. In simple terms, it provided an easy path for one computer to interact with another by utilising an HTTP protocol. The communication between the two computers is not stored on the server, meaning it is stateless; rather the client sessions are stored on a client-side server. 

There are six constraints necessary to implement REST in the complete sense. 

  • It needs a separated client and server; 
  • It needs to be able to make independent calls;
  • It needs to able to store cacheable data;
  • It needs to have a uniform interface;
  • It is a layered system; 
  • Finally, it needs a code-on-demand. 

REST offers a great deal of functionality without a lot of effort. For instance, if you are working on someone else’s RESTful API, you would not need a special library or special initialisation. Yes, your developers need to design their own data model using REST, but the HTTP conventions at play make programming a breeze. 

To know how REST plays a key role in decoupling Drupal, read our blog REST APIs in Drupal.

JSON: API  

JSON stands for JavaScript Object Notation. Built in May of 2013, it was designed as an encoding scheme, eliminating the need for ad-hoc code for every application to communicate with servers, which use a defined way for the same. JSON: API, like the name says, is a specification for building APIs using JSON. 

With JSON: API, communication between the server and the client becomes extremely convenient. It not only formats the way a request should be written, but the responses also come in a formatted manner. The primary aim of JSON: API is to lessen the number of requests and shrink the size of the package, all using HTTP protocol. 

Broadly stated; 

  • JSON reduces the number of requests and amount of data being transmitted; 
  • It requires zero configuration; 
  • It uses the same JSON access scheme for every piece of data, making caching very effective;
  • It offers quite a few features and gives you, as the client, the opportunity to turn them on or off. 

To know how JSON:API plays a key role in decoupling Drupal, read our blog, JSON API in Drupal.

GraphQL 

While JSON can work alongside REST, GraphQL was designed as an alternate to it and some of its inconveniences. Built in 2012 by Facebook, it acts as a cross-platform data query and manipulation language. Its servers are available in numerous popular languages, being Java, JavaScript, Ruby, Python, C#, amongst others. 

The features of GraphQL are that; 

  • It allows users to request data from multiple resources in a single request.
  • It can be used to make ad-hoc queries to one endpoint and access all the needed data.
  • It gives the client the opportunity to specify the exact type of data needed from the server. 
  • All of these add to its predictable data structure, making it readable as well as efficient. 

It was in 2015, after GraphQL was open-sourced that it became truly popular. Now its development is governed by The GraphQL Foundation, which is hosted by the Linux Foundation. 

To know how GraphQL plays a key role in decoupling Drupal, read our blog, GraphQL in Drupal.

Now that we know the basics of all the three APIs, let us have a look at their popularity status, before beginning the comparison. 

A glimpse at the popularity of the three APIs. Source: State of API Report 2020REST vs JSON vs GraphQL 

Now let’s get down to the details and understand why choosing one over the other two could be in your best interest. Let’s start with the differences between REST, JSON:API and GraphQL.

How efficient is the data retrieval?


One of the most important aspects for an API is the way its fetches data. It could require one or more requests. Therefore, this aspect is also referred to as its request efficiency. Getting multiple data responses in a single request has to be an ideal, so let’s see how REST, JSON: API and GraphQL here. 

REST 

The REST API is innately built to capitalise one resource per request. This works perfectly as long as you only need to retrieve a single piece of data like an article. However, if you need more than that, the number of requests you would have to type in separately would be equivalent to the amount of data you need. 

One article = one request 
Two articles = two requests
Two articles and the author information stored in a different field = Two requests for the articles + a long wait for the completion of those requests + two additional requests for the author information. 

This sums up REST’s request efficiency to the T. You require to be equipped to handle a number of requests, which can ultimately stall your user experience, making it seem to go at a snail’s pace. No sugar-coating here, there are going to be a lot of round trips. 

And the problem with a lot of round trips is a lot of extra information you do not even need. This is because there is a possibility that a REST API endpoint might not have the required data for an application. As a result, the said application will not get everything it needs in a single trip, making multiple trips the only option. It's safe to say that REST over-fetches and the verbose responses can be a problem.

JSON: API 

JSON: API does not suffer from the multiple request conundrum. One single request can give you everything you want, be it one article, two or ten along with the author’s information, I kid you not. 

This is possible because JSON: API implements a concept called ‘sparse fields.’ What this does is list the desired resource fields together for easy fetching. You can have as many fields as possible. If you feel the fields are too long and would not be cacheable, you can simply omit a few sparse fieldsets to cache the request. 

Another thing to remember is that the servers can choose sensible defaults, so your developers would need to be a little diligent to avoid over-fetching. 

GraphQL 

Coming to GraphQL, it was also designed in a similar fashion to JSON: API and is competent enough to eliminate the problem of over-fetching and avoid sending multiple requests. 

GraphQL has its own queries, schema and resolvers that aid the developers in creating API calls with particular data requirements in mind. Moreover, by mandating clear-cut additions to every resource field in every query and ensuring the developers cannot skip any of it,  it is able to avoid multiple round trips. Thereby, making over-fetching information a thing of the past. 

The only problem here can be that the queries may become too large, and consequently, cannot be cached. 

How is the code executed?


Using an API for calls involves the execution of a code on the server. This code helps in computing, calling another API or loading data from a database. All three of the APIs use a code, however, the code is implemented varies a little.

REST 

Route handlers are utilised for execution upon a REST call. These are basically functions for specific URLs. 

  • First the server receives the call and retrieves the URL path and GET; 
  • Then the functions are noted and the servers begins finding the same by matching GET and the path; 
  • After that the result is generated, since the server would have executed the function; 
  • In the final step, once the result is serialised by the API library, it is ready for the client to see. 

GraphQL

GraphQL operates in a relatively similar manner. The only difference is that it uses functions for a field within a type, like a Query type, instead of using functions for specific URLs.  

Route handlers are replaced by resolvers in GraphQL, they are still functions though.

  • After the call is made and the server has received a request, the GraphQL query is retrieved. 
  • The query is then examined and the resolver is called upon for every field. 
  • Finally, the result is added to the response by the GraphQL library and it is ready for the client to see. 

It should be noted that GraphQL offers much more flexibility as multiple fields can be requested in one request, and the same field can be called multiple times in one query.  The fact they let you know where you performance needs fine-tuning makes resolvers excellent trackers as well. 

This is simply not possible in REST and JSON. Do you see the difference in implementation? 

How do the API endpoints play a role?

Many a time, it is seen that once the API is designed and the endpoints are sealed, the applications require frontend iterations that cannot be avoided. You must know that the endpoints aid an application to receive the required data just by accessing it quickly in the view, so you could call them essential even. 

However, the endpoints can pose a bit of a problem for the iterations, especially when they need to be quick. Since, in such an instance, changes in the API endpoints have to be made for every change in the frontend, the backend gets tedious for no reason at all. The data required for the same can be on the heavier side or the lighter side, which ultimately hampers the productivity. 

So, which API offers the solution?

It is neither REST, nor JSON. GraphQL’s flexibility makes it easy for the developers to write queries mentioning the specific data needs along with iterations for the development of the frontend, without the backend having to bear the brunt.

Moreover, GraphQL’s queries help developers on retrieving specific data elements and provide insights to the user as to which elements are popular and which aren’t amongst the clients.  

Why doesn’t REST? 

The answer is simple, REST has the entire data in a single API endpoint. Being a user, you won’t be able to gain insights on the use of specific data as the whole of it always returned. 

How good is the API exploration?


Understanding your API and knowing about all of its resources and that too quickly and with ease is always going to benefit your developers. In this aspect, all three perform pretty contrastingly. 

REST 

REST gives a lacklustre performance in API exploration to be honest. The interactivity is pretty substandard as the navigation links are seldom available. 

In terms of the schema, it would only be programmable and validatable, if you are going to be using the OpenAPI standard. The auto-generation of the documentation also depends on the same. 

JSON: API 

JSON performs better than REST. The observation of the available field and links in JSON: API’s responses helps in its exploration and makes its interactivity quite good. You can explore it using a web browser, cURL or Postman

Browsing from one resource to the next, debugging or even trying to develop on top of an HTTP-based API, like REST, can be done through a web browser alongside JSON. 

GraphQL 

GraphQL is indeed the front-runner here. It has an impressive feature, known as the GraphiQL, due to which its API exploration is unparalleled. It is an in-browser IDE, which allows the developers to create queries repeatedly. 

What is even more impressive is the fact the queries get auto-completed based on the suggestions it provides and you get real-time results. 

Let’s focus on schema now 


Schemas are important for the development team, the frontend and the backend equally. It is because once a schema has been defined, your team would know the data structure and can work in parallel. Creating dummy test data as well as testing the application would be easy for the frontend developers. All in all, the productivity and efficiency levels elevate. 

REST

REST does have an associated expected resource schema since it is a set of standard verbiage. Despite this, there is nothing that is specifically stated in them. 

JSON: API 

In terms of schema validation and programming, it does define a generic one, however, a reliable field-level schema is yet to be seen. Simply put, JSON is basic with regards to schema. 

GraphQL

The fact that GraphQL functions completely on schemas makes it a pro in this regard. The schema used here is Schema Definition Language or SDL. What this means is that GraphQL uses a type system that sets out the types in an API because all the types are included in SDL. Thus, defining the way a client should access data on the server becomes easy. 

To conclude this point, I would want to say that when there is immense complexity in the schema and resource relationships, it can pose a disadvantage for the API.  

How simple is to operate it? 


Operating an API essentially involves everything, from installing and configuring it to scaling and making it secure. REST, JSON: API and GraphQL, all perform well enough to make themselves easy to operate. Let’s see how. 

REST 

REST is quite simple to use, a walk in the park for a pro developer. It is because REST is dependent on the conventional HTTP verbiage and techniques. You would not need to transform the underlying resources by much, since it can be supported by almost anything. It also has a lot of tools available for the developers, however, these are dependent on their customisation before they can be implemented. 

In terms of scaling, REST is extremely scalable, handling high traffic websites is no problem at all. To take advantage of the same, you can make use of a reverse proxy like Varnish or CDN. Another plus point of REST is that it has limited points of failure, being the server and the client. 

JSON: API 

JSON: API is more or less the same as REST in terms of its operational simplicity, so much so that you can move from REST to JSON: API without any extensive costs. 

  • It also relies on HTTP; 
  • It is also extremely scalable; 
  • It also has numerous developer tools, but unlike REST, JSON: API does not need customised implementations; 
  • Lastly, JSON also has fewer failure points. 

GraphQL 

GraphQL is the odd one out here. It isn’t as simple to use as the other two. It necessitates specific relational structure and specific mechanisms for interlocking. You would be thinkin that how is this complex? Let me ask you to focus on word specific, what this means is that you might need to restructure your entire API with regards to resource logic. And you must know that such restructuring would cost you time, money and a boatload of efforts. 

Even in terms of scalability, GraphQL does not fare very well. The most basic requests also tend to use GET requests. For you to truly capitalise GraphQL, your servers would need their own tooling. If I talk about the points of failure here, even those are many, including client, server, client-side caching and client and build tooling. 

What about being secure?


The kind of security an API offers is also an important consideration in choosing it. A drastic difference is noted in REST and GraphQL. Let’s see what that is. 

REST 

REST is the most secure amongst the three. The intrinsic security features in REST are the reason for the achievement. 

  • There are different APU authentication methods, inclusive of HTTP authentication;
  • There are the JSON Web Tokens for sensitive data in HTTP headers;
  • There are also the standard OAuth 2.0 mechanisms for sensitive data in JSON structure. 

JSON:API

JSON:API is on a similar footing to REST in terms of security. The reason being the fact that like REST it exposes little resources.  

GraphQL 

It is not like GraphQL is not secure, it is; however, the security has to be manually attained. It is not secure by default and it is not as mature as REST in this regard. 

When the user has to apply authentication and authorisation measures on top of data validation, the chances of unpredictable authorisation checks rise. Now, do I have to tell you that such an event is bound to jeopardise your security? 

How is the API design pinpointed?


If an API has to perform well for every use case, you have to make it do so. By creating such design choices that are a result of your understanding of the users’ needs. You cannot just go with the flow, evaluating how your users are going to be interacting with your API and getting an understanding of the same is key for your API’s design. 

REST

For REST, this exercise of deciphering the user requirements must happen before the API can be implemented. 

GraphQL 

As for GraphQL, this apprehension can be delayed a little. By profiling the queries, you would be able to tell their complexity level and pinpoint the sluggish queries to get to an understanding of user’s consumption of the API. 

What about their use in Drupal?  


Drupal is an important player when it comes to building websites and managing their content. With decoupling Drupal becoming more and more popular, it has become crucial to understand how the APIs perform alongside Drupal. 

REST 

Talking about the installation and configuration of REST, it can be complicated at best. The fact that the REST module has to be accompanied by the REST UI module does not ease the complexity. 

With REST, the clients that cannot create queries with the needed filters on their own, since the REST module does not support client-generated collection queries. This is often referred to as decoupled filtering.  

JSON:API 

JSON:API module landed in Drupal core in Drupal 8.7. JSON:API’s configuration is as easy as ABC, there is simply nothing to configure. JSON is a clear winner in this aspect. 

Moving to client-generated queries, JSON does offer its clients this luxury. They can generate their own content queries and they won't need a server-side configuration for the same. JSON’s ability to manage access control mechanisms offered by Drupal make changing an incoming query easy. This is a default feature in JSON:API.

GraphQL 

The installation of GraphQL is also not as complicated as REST, but it isn’t as easy as JSON as well. This is because it does mandate some level of configuration from you. 

Similar to JSON, GraphQL also offers decoupled filtering with client generated queries. A less common trend amongst GraphQL projects is seeking permissions for persisted queries over client-generated queries; entailing a return to the conventional Views-like pattern.

In addition to these three major Drupal web services, explore other alternatives in the decoupled Drupal ecosystem worthy of a trial. Read everything about decoupled Drupal, the architecture-level differences between headless and traditional setups, different ways to decouple Drupal, and the skills required to build a Decoupled Drupal web application to know more.

Concluding with the basics 

To sum up, let us look at the fundamental nature of the three APIs, which entails two aspects; simplicity and functionality. 

In terms of simplicity, REST is a winner. A second would be rewarded to JSON, while GraphQL would not and could not be described as simple, complex and that too immensely with major implementations coming your way would be a more accurate description. In terms of functionality, GraphQL does offer the most. If you choose JSON over GraphQL, you would end up parting with some of its features unfound in JSON. 

All three are powerful and efficient in what they can do for your application. The question is how much complexity are you willing to take up with that power?

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