Drupal News

Liip: What is Liip’s contribution to a better world?

Main Drupal Feed - Tue, 05/24/2022 - 22:00

Together with our clients, we want to maximise our impact on sustainable development. We distinguish between the impact on people and the environment resulting from within Liip, and from the projects that we implement. So the HOW and the WHAT. We wrote extensively about the HOW last year.

What are Sustainable Development Goals?

In 2015, the UN adopted the Sustainable Development Goals. The 17 goals set out the key areas of the social, environmental and economic sustainable development that the global community seeks to achieve. Examples include measures on climate action (13) or protecting life below water (14) and on land (15).

We opted for the internationally broadly supported SDGs,because the current proliferation of tools and labels are obstacles more than help. There is currently no single standard, as has been in place for decades for financial accounting, for example.

So that we do not lose an opportunity, we are using the SDGs to collect impact data at a very high level of granularity across all aspects of sustainability.

What exactly are we measuring?

How does the project affect the SDGs? Which SDGs more than others? And what about the company behind it: is there a clear, mandatory message regarding its impact on humans and the environment? We have assigned a percentage weighting to the individual goals. For example, topics such as species protection (14/15) or climate action (13) are weighted much more heavily for a food producer than they would be for a training company.

We then take a look at how strongly connected the project is with the company’s activities. Does the project represent the client’s main area of activity, or is it far removed from its core business? The project’s classification may be congruent with the company, may be separate, or may be a mixture of both.

For each individual aspect, we rate the contribution to a specific sustainability goal on a scale of -2 to +2. We use objective, measurable criteria wherever possible. For example, has a company made a clear and verifiable statement using recognised methods regarding if and how it expects to achieve the climate targets from the Paris Agreement?

Figure 1: Relevance and impact assessment of the individual UN goals of the client project

Of course, there are also assessments for which we lack the data basis. This is a weak point, and we will try to cross-check with recognised agencies wherever possible, especially for large-scale projects.

Figure 2: Sustainability impact of a customer product, composed of company impact (here 80%) and project impact (here 20%)

And how well are we performing?

Our first ‘inventory’ offered a fundamentally good result. Most projects are positively contributing to the SDGs, respectively do not produce any demonstrable damage. This is also thanks to the fact that we have consistently rejected critical projects ever since the company was founded – for example, any projects related to oil production or conflict materials. We are therefore beginning the measurement with a ‘beneficial’ portfolio. Due to the fact that the topic of biodiversity as a whole still receives far too little attention in the economy. This also influences our portfolio. We will pay special attention to this goal.

We now have an overall picture of our activities. This enables us to prioritise specific goals that are not doing so well more strategically.To keep it simple, we multiply the hours worked on a project by the impact on a goal. Admittedly, this is rather imprecise, but it is still meaningful for us because it gives us an indicator of what we are spending our time on in the first place.

Figure 3: Effect of hours worked for clients per SDG

Is this just greenwashing?

There are currently huge amounts of activity relating to impact measurement. And much of this is marginal. Sustainability is currently in fashion, and often things that are brown and unfair are painted green and put in a social light. Because we are aware of this, we are operating as cautiously as possible by setting broad system limits, and by drawing on a holistic metric with the SDGs. And, in the event of doubt, we make a more conservative assessment to avoid a false sense of security. As a point of principle, we obtain publicly available evidence and statements from companies wherever these are available.

What is the next step?

We plan to take this chosen approach a long way. Most likely further than the majority of SMEs in the service sector in Switzerland. In their role as suppliers, we want our clients to receive added value from their proven impact.

However, this is a risk and ventures into much uncharted territory. We are currently gaining experience and identifying a series of focus topics, through which we will be able to use our skills to provide our clients with the greatest positive contribution toward sustainable development.

To be continued.

Théodore 'nod_' Biadala: JavaScript management in Non-JavaScript CMS

Main Drupal Feed - Tue, 05/24/2022 - 19:45

I wrote this post from scratch about 7 times over the last few months, and I’m not getting anywhere so I’ll write up something, it’s not perfect, I took a few shortcuts but having a discussion going is more important than a perfect post.

Situation

JavaScript development went from widget-based add-ons for functional HTML pages to being responsible for HTML page assembly and even basic browser interactions (such as navigation, form submission, etc.)

In the first case, the JS files are standalone-ish, they usually depend on a bigger library (like jQuery) and sticking them on the page with a script tag is enough for things to work. Makes it easy to assemble pages at runtime based on the original JS source. Additional processing can be done on the JS file to minify or gzip it but it doesn’t go much further than this. This is what Drupal and most other CMSs that have been around for a while do very well.

This worked well until the push for better UX shifted more and more responsibilities to the frontend. More responsibilities translate to more code sent, minification wasn’t enough and JS libraries got bigger and became frameworks with smarter tools, we began to see an optimization or build step to transform development code into running code. This is around the time where CMSs started to get left behind I’d say.

Fast forward to now where the whole site/application is in JavaScript and the framework needs to build the application before it can even be loaded. It’s not really possible to add or remove functionality at runtime, if there is a change in the application, the whole application needs to be built again. On top of this frameworks are now competing in server side rendering capabilities.

Problem

How to accommodate JS as it is written today with the CMSs way of consuming it?

Drupal

Essentially, transform a monolithic JS application in a set of files that are optional and can be loaded at runtime without the need of a build step. One partially successful example of this is how CKEditor 5 has been integrated into Drupal by using the relatively new Webpack DllPlugin, instead of building a single JS file with all the WYSIWYG tools, each tool is packaged in it’s own file that can be loaded at runtime without fuss. This solution still needs a build step but at least the result of the build step can be used dynamically.

Wordpress

In the case of Wordpress they solved the problem simply by going all JS with Gutenberg: a whole new repo, only JS/React code, very little PHP in sight, and a great opportunity to generate engagement by creating a new way of doing things. It seems to be working well for them.

Symfony

Symfony went with a Yaml API around nodejs tooling with Webpack Encore. Still need nodejs installed and all it comes with.

Another way?

Personally I would like to explore an alternative path before considering to move all-in on the JS way of doing things, and require nodejs for hosting a Drupal website, a path that can help mitigate some of the pain of JS tooling. There is no reason for JS tooling to be written only in JS, there is already a bunch of tools written in rust, as long as you can read the file, you can make the same transformations in any language.

I’d like to see a set of PHP-based tools that helps manage JS, in a way that the build step is actually handled by the CMS so that people writing Drupal code do not need to care about nodejs, tooling, package updates, etc. For example I would love to write JavaScript modules and have the dependencies automatically picked up and declared in Drupal and at the same time, have Drupal aggregate all those modules in a single file. Something that is surprisingly impossible to do natively for now hopefully. Until then I’m itching to use peast to transform JS from PHP and start making tools that remove problems for PHP developers.

What do you think?

As as said in the beginning this post is a bit messy, I’m not comparing the same things or define what it is that the build step should be doing or not doing, but I’m happy to just talk about the topic and see what others think.

Specbee: What to expect in Drupal 10

Main Drupal Feed - Tue, 05/24/2022 - 07:34
What to expect in Drupal 10 Alok Aman 24 May, 2022

If you were at DrupalCon Portland 2022 or watched the recording of DriesNote, you’re probably aware that the release date of Drupal 10 has been moved back by a few months. Drupal 10 is now expected to release in December 2022 (which was a plan-B scheduled release date anyway). We’ll touch on the reason the dates were pushed from June 2022 to December 2022 first. But read on for all the things to look forward to in Drupal 10.

If you’re still on Drupal 7 (or 6), the time is right to migrate to Drupal 9 now. Upgrades to Drupal 10 and all the following versions are going to be easy forever!

Why not June 2022 for Drupal 10

A flexible content editor is a fundamental part of any content management system. CKEditor has been a part of Drupal’s family of modules since Drupal 6 and has become a favorite editing tool amongst users. CKEditor 4.5 is the default WYSIWYG rich text editor for Drupal 8/9. 

The big news here is that Drupal 10 will have the all-new features of CKEditor 5. It’s going to be more powerful, easily customizable, perfect UX and will come with a modular architecture. With CKEditor 5 in Drupal 10, we foresee a bigger adoption of Drupal as a blogging platform.

However, CKEditor 5 is a complete rewrite of CKEditor with no backwards compatibility or upgrade path. Almost like a Drupal 7 to Drupal 8 rebuild. The Drupal community has been working closely with the CKEditor team at CKSource on this and has spent thousands of hours creating an upgrade path from CKEditor 4 to CKEditor 5 for Drupal 10. But there still is a lot of work to be done to push it to the finish line and to make sure it is easy for site builders to upgrade from CKEditor 4 to 5. 

With that and CKEditor 5 being an integral part of Drupal 10, the scheduled release date had to be pushed to December 2022.

What’s New with Drupal 10

Drupal 10 is going to be the more updated and polished version of Drupal 9. It comes with some updated additions of new features and removal of some deprecations.

Updated Third-Party Software

Drupal now works on different third-party components. It’s essential to work with the updated versions of these modern libraries and features. These components perform better and are more user-friendly. Drupal 10 websites will be able to leverage the innovations of these components.

Symfony 6.2

Drupal relies heavily on the Symfony framework. It is the foremost driver of Drupal since version 8. Drupal 9 uses Symfony version 4, which is reaching end of life and support by November 2022. So apparently, the Drupal 9 to Drupal 10 upgrade will be skipping a version of Symfony (Symfony 4 to 6). Symfony 6.2 will be released just in time for Drupal 10’s release and will have many modern features that developers are going to love.

CKEditor 5

As already discussed earlier in this post, Drupal 10 will ship with the awesome CKEditor 5, replacing CKEditor 4 for good. CKEditor 5 is supported in Drupal 9.3 as an experimental module but is not stable. CKEditors is not only great for site builders because of its user-friendliness and great UX, it is also a great framework for developers to customize and build upon. It will look a lot like MS Word or Google documents and will have a ton of integrations to make it richer and more efficient.

  PHP 8.1

The Drupal project team has decided to increase the requirement of PHP to PHP 8.1 in Drupal 10. Symfony 6.2 will require PHP 8.1 version and hence the dependency. Since version Drupal 9.1, PHP 8.0 has been supported. PHP 7.4 will reach end of life by November 2022, so if you are using PHP 7.4, it is time to upgrade!

  JQuery

There may be a final replacement of the jQuery UI with modern JavaScript components. Drupal 10 will now no longer support Internet Explorer 11.

Auto-Updating Features

How awesome would it be if your website could update itself?!

With Drupal 10, developers and site builders can automatically enable secure and easy updates. The automatic updates feature will be introduced to Drupal 10 core and is present for completely composer based sites. The Automatic Updates Initiative has done some significant work in areas such as UX enhancements, package deal signing for progressed security and trying out with various host providers.

Decoupled Menus

Drupal is now moving closer to being a headless CMS. The Decoupled Menus Initiative is a huge step in this direction. It can assist to build a number of ways for JavaScript front-ends to apply Drupal website menus. It is a contributed module presently but will be included in core later. Content creators and marketing teams also can replace the menu via the Drupal UI without a developer’s involvement. The changes will be reflected in the JavaScript front-end automatically.

Olivero New Default Front-End Theme

A new and modern Olivero theme is taking accessibility to a whole new level. Olivero will replace Bartik as the default front-end theme for websites in Drupal 10. It is designed to be extremely user-friendly especially for people with vision disabilities. The content material is simple to navigate and the forms have been properly designed too. No issues are found while focusing, contrasting or scaling. Olivero is already stable in Drupal 9.3.

  New Started Kit Theme

There might be a brand new starter kit theme in Drupal 10, providing a new way for theming in Drupal. Developers were using the Classy theme for sub-theming requirements. Front-end developers could have a starting point for themes. It is important to understand that the starter kit changes will not have an effect on the production themes now. It will be easier to maintain. The introduction of the new tool will remove support for Classy as it will be deprecated. It is currently in alpha and is on track to be released by Drupal 10.

Final thoughts

Are you as excited as we are about Drupal 10? You can try out the Alpha release of Drupal 10 right away to play around with it just like we did. All of these new features we discussed will take Drupal’s usability and adoption to a whole new level. In Dries’ words, Drupal has made the web better and it is much bigger than just a CMS. It is used by 1 out of 30 websites in the world and without a doubt has a huge influence on the future of the web. As a Drupal development company, we contribute to the Drupal project so we can make an impact for a better web. If you’re looking to make an impact too, consider joining the Drupal community to contribute and make a difference.

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Community Working Group posts: Evaluating Drupal's Code of Conduct

Main Drupal Feed - Mon, 05/23/2022 - 20:25

Over the past couple of years, the Drupal Community Working Group has talked about reviewing and possibly updating the existing Drupal Code of Conduct. The process has had several starts, but mainly due to contributor bandwidth hasn't gained much traction to this point.

As reported in 2019, 

The current Drupal Code of Conduct was adopted in 2010 and last revised in 2014. Over the last two years, the CWG has received consistent feedback from the community that the Drupal Code of Conduct should be updated so that it is clearer and more actionable.

In the two years since, the Community Working Group has had several meetings focused on the Code of Conduct. They have identified some tasks, goals, and challenges including:

  • Reviewing Codes of Conduct from other communities.
  • Reviewing the findings from the community discussions led by Whitney Hess in 2017. 
  • How best to gather and utilize community feedback.

Recently, a group of Community Health Team members met to kickstart the process once again in hopes of finding the proper balance of tasks and timeline to determine what, if any, updates to the Code of Conduct are necessary. Community Health Team members at the first meeting include: 

The group, led by George DeMet, is still in the initial planning stages, trying to figure out a rough outline of tasks to achieve the goal. Our first activity was to work with a list of tasks and challenges to refine and organize them into logical groups, such as "project goals", "what are we missing", and "action items".


Snippet of the CoC update jamboard

We are still in the very early part of this effort, but are determined to keep momentum by having bi-weekly meetings, along with a blog post (like this) after each meeting to keep the community informed on the progress that’s being made and share opportunities for community participation.

Questions? Concerns? Let us know in the comments below!
 

Talking Drupal: Talking Drupal #348 - A Website’s Carbon Footprint

Main Drupal Feed - Mon, 05/23/2022 - 18:00

Today we are talking about A Website’s Carbon Footprint with Gerry McGovern.

www.talkingDrupal.com/348

Topics
  • Earth day
  • What is a carbon footprint
  • How do websites contribute
  • How can you calculate your site’s impact
  • Cloud vs dedicated hosting
  • How do you determine a vendor’s impact
  • Small sites VS FAANG
  • How to improve your site
Resources Guests

Gerry McGovern - gerrymcgovern.com @gerrymcgovern

Hosts

Nic Laflin - www.nLighteneddevelopment.com @nicxvan John Picozzi - www.epam.com @johnpicozzi Chris Wells - redfinsolutions.com - @chrisfromredfin

MOTW

Config Pages At some point I was tired of creating custom pages using menu and form API, writing tons of code just to have a page with an ugly form where a client can enter some settings, and as soon as a client wants to add some interactions to the page (drag&drop, ajax etc) things starts to get hairy. The same story was with the creation of dedicated CT just to theme a single page (like homepage) and explaining why you can only have 1 node of this type, or force it programmatically.

Better

Drupal Themes - Sun, 05/22/2022 - 09:44

This theme intended towards 'The Ambitious Site Builder'

More to come soon.

Palantir: My Events Life Post-COVID

Main Drupal Feed - Thu, 05/19/2022 - 12:00

How an events professional turned communications manager got back her groove

How It Started

I missed the magic of events.

Having spent the majority of my life in the “before times” organizing, planning, and executing strategic events for organizations ranging in nature from small nonprofits to medium-sized private sector to large-scale public sector, events have always given me an energy that is hard to describe. There is a profound and extraordinary element to witnessing, in real time, the result of my weeks of hard work. It makes me want to wave my arms wildly and announce to anyone in earshot, “Hey, look! You see that awesome event? I did that!”

I ended 2019 knowing that 2020 would be the best events year yet. As an independent strategic communications and events consultant in Washington, D.C., I had clients lined up - there were weddings to plan, conferences to schedule, and trade shows to organize.
 

How It Transformed

Well, that didn’t go as planned.

Events transitioned to Zoom, or Google Meet, or to less than five people if it was in person. Happy occasions that should’ve been celebrated were dulled and diluted, and professional events electrified by the annual expectation of seeing old friends and meeting new faces came to a starkly bleak and screeching halt.

I didn’t know what to do.

I found myself limited, concerned, uninspired, stuck. I had lost my events fix, and it was becoming exceedingly apparent and incredibly difficult to navigate.

Then I moved from the East Coast to the Midwest in search of a fresh start - one that hopefully, at one point, would include a live event or two.

Within four months, I began my journey as Communications Manager with Palantir.net, which was the beginning of one of the best professional experiences of my life. And then, only about a year and a half later, I had the opportunity to attend DrupalCon.

For the record: I had zero experience in the open source tech industry, and had only a basic knowledge about what open source even was. Needless to say, I was also a complete stranger to Drupal and its community.
 

How It Went

Also for the record: DrupalCon was an absolutely amazing experience.

  • I got to see some of my colleagues again for the first time in months, and met some others for the first time, in person.
  • I got to have an amazing dinner with fellow Palantiri at Grain and Gristle. Its website offers farm fare, a locally-focused bar, and warm service - and we received all three.
  • I got to meet and connect with Drupal community members from companies big and small, both familiar and unfamiliar to me.
  • I went to informative classes with insightful speakers and insightful fellow attendees  - my highlight was The Women in Drupal Luncheon, which was an enlightening, empowering, and wholly collaborative experience.
  • I went to three after-conference events, where I got to know fellow Drupal community members on a personal level, from a rave at the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry, hosted by Acquia; to a much-needed chill night spent laughing on a gorgeous patio hosted by platform.sh; and, the highlight of my afterparty experience, was meeting Caesar the No Drama Llama and dancing to an epic band covering '80s and '90s classics with The Goonies playing in the background, hosted by Pantheon.

Needless to say, I was exceptionally exhausted but exceptionally happy to be back in the in-person events world. It was something I didn't know I had craved and needed until the first hour into the conference. But after those 60 minutes? I was all in and couldn't have enjoyed it more. 
 

How It'll Go

From here, I have every intention to attend DrupalCon 2023 in Pittsburgh.

I also had the pleasure of connecting with folks who welcomed me into becoming involved with MidCamp - an event resuming in-person in 2023, which offers four days of Drupal fun including (but certainly not limited to) a community introduction day, livestream social, unconference, and contribution day.  

So, how does it go beyond that?

In my estimation, it goes very, very well. I feel like a full member of the Drupal community - a member who can provide input, connection, events advice, collaboration, and, most importantly, support.

It's a good feeling, and I'm glad to be back.

See you next year, Pittsburgh! 

Photo by Rachel Waddick featuring the Drupal drop

Community Drupal Events Open Source People

Drupal Association blog: GAAD Pledge 2022 - Extending Drupal's Accessibility

Main Drupal Feed - Thu, 05/19/2022 - 05:00

Posted on behalf of the Drupal accessibility maintainers.

The Drupal community is again celebrating Global Accessibility Awareness Day (GAAD) but this time we are excited to also announce that the Drupal CMS has taken the GAAD pledge to formalize accessibility as a core value of our framework. Our commitment to accessibility isn’t new, but we are excited to join React Native and Ember JS, previous GAAD Pledgees, to be a public open source leader in pushing forward accessibility to the community.

Digital accessibility is an important issue because so much of our lives are currently mediated through the internet. Globally, over a billion people have some form of permanent disability. Not all people with disabilities face barriers on the web, but when looking at temporary and situational disabilities, they can affect us all. The Drupal community proudly includes people with disabilities. The million or so Drupal sites serve people with every combination of visual, mobility, auditory, physical, speech and cognitive disabilities.

Drupal has been a leader in CMS accessibility for over a decade. Drupal community events (local and global) have had presentations about WCAG and ATAG for nearly 20 years.

Drupal 7 (2011) embraced WCAG 2.0 for both the front-end and back-end of the interface. This is still uncommon for CMSes. As a blind developer, Everett Zufelt was key to bringing the community onboard with this. Everett led many of the early Drupal 7 discussions and became Core’s first Accessibility Maintainer. We were early adopters of ARIA and added limited implementations to Drupal years before ARIA 1.0 was released. We were one of the first CMSes that tried to build standardized patterns designed explicitly to address common accessibility problems.

Drupal 8 (2014) was one of the first CMSes to adopt ATAG 2.0 to support authors in creating more accessible content. We introduced a means to manage aria-live for dynamic content and control the tab order for keyboard-only users. Drupal made many advances in accessibility such as improvements to form errors and requiring image alt text. This release also benefited from the work of Vincenzo Rubano, a blind Italian student who contributed to Drupal Core. In this release we also took on broader adoption of ARIA and started deploying elements of WCAG 2.1.

There is a lot more in the works for Drupal 9 and 10. Drupal 9 saw the introduction of two new accessible themes, Claro and Olivero. Olivero is now our default theme, and named in memory of Rachel Olivero, a stand-out member of the Drupal Diversity and Inclusion community. Rachel, a blind user, also worked with the NFB (National Federation of the Blind) on building their web platform on Drupal. The NFB was generous enough to review this new Drupal theme prior to release.

Drupal was one of the CMSes represented in the We4Authors Cluster, with other CMSes used by governments in the European Union. Drupal is also looking ahead at WCAG 2.2 and WCAG 3.0, with one of our Accessibility Maintainers actively involved in the Working Groups for these guidelines.

We have done a lot, but accessibility is a journey. As long as Drupal continues evolving to keep up with ever emerging internet and accessibility technologies, there will be more to do.

Our 2022 Pledge
  1. Accessibility is a core value of the Drupal CMS, all Drupal websites, and our events (Our community embraces accessibility).
  2. In 2022 we will formally upgrade our standards to WCAG 2.1 AA (Our community process and project governance will continue to align with the latest recommended release of the WCAG guidelines).
  3. We will publish a new coding standards document to clarify our accessibility practices (Accessibility isn’t currently in our coding standards).
  4. Our documentation will be updated to ensure that it includes current best practices (Updating documentation is something that always needs to be done).
  5. We will continue tracking accessibility issues for all Drupal.org projects and tagging them for transparency.
How You Can Help

We also invite everyone to help make Drupal a more accessible framework. There are lots of ways to get involved! Here are a few ideas:

  • Download the latest version (ideally the Git release) and test for accessibility. This could just be using SimplyTest.me.
  • Contribute accessibility bugs that you find back into the Drupal issue queue. Make sure to tag them with “accessibility” and ensure that you have included how to replicate the barrier.
  • Review the modules you are using in your site and contribute where you can to make them more robust and inclusive. Remember to tag those issues with “accessibility” as well.
  • Look through the We4Authors Cluster suggestions and see if there are opportunities to improve the support we are able to provide to authors.
  • Provide feedback to the team by joining the #accessibility channel on the Drupal Slack.

Today we reaffirm our commitment to accessibility by taking the GAAD Pledge. As we continually improve Drupal, accessibility will be a core part of what we do.

The Drop Times: How Can You Make Your Website More Accessible?

Main Drupal Feed - Thu, 05/19/2022 - 02:13
Despite the amazing modules and features there is still more to do. Here is what you can do to make your website more Accessible.

Nonprofit Drupal posts: May Drupal for Nonprofits Chat

Main Drupal Feed - Wed, 05/18/2022 - 19:29

We are looking for an additional co-moderator for this group! Reach out to Jess or Johanna to learn more about what's involved.

Our normally scheduled call to chat about all things Drupal and nonprofits will happen TOMORROW, Thursday, May 19 at 1pm ET / 10am PT. (Convert to your local time zone.)

We'll be getting a report on the happenings at DrupalCon from those who attended, and then having an informal chat about anything at the intersection of Drupal and nonprofits. Got something specific on your mind? Feel free to share ahead of time in our collaborative Google doc: https://nten.org/drupal/notes!

All nonprofit Drupal devs and users, regardless of experience level, are always welcome on this call.

This free call is sponsored by NTEN.org and open to everyone. 

  • Join the call: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/81817469653

    • Meeting ID: 818 1746 9653
      Passcode: 551681

    • One tap mobile:
      +16699006833,,81817469653# US (San Jose)
      +13462487799,,81817469653# US (Houston)

    • Dial by your location:
      +1 669 900 6833 US (San Jose)
      +1 346 248 7799 US (Houston)
      +1 253 215 8782 US (Tacoma)
      +1 929 205 6099 US (New York)
      +1 301 715 8592 US (Washington DC)
      +1 312 626 6799 US (Chicago)

    • Find your local number: https://us02web.zoom.us/u/kpV1o65N

  • Follow along on Google Docs: https://nten.org/drupal/notes
  • Follow along on Twitter: #npdrupal

View notes of previous months' calls.

Nonprofit Drupal posts: May Drupal for Nonprofits Chat

Main Drupal Feed - Wed, 05/18/2022 - 19:29

We are looking for an additional co-moderator for this group! Reach out to Jess or Johanna to learn more about what's involved.

Our normally scheduled call to chat about all things Drupal and nonprofits will happen TOMORROW, Thursday, May 19 at 1pm ET / 10am PT. (Convert to your local time zone.)

We'll be getting a report on the happenings at DrupalCon from those who attended, and then having an informal chat about anything at the intersection of Drupal and nonprofits. Got something specific on your mind? Feel free to share ahead of time in our collaborative Google doc: https://nten.org/drupal/notes!

All nonprofit Drupal devs and users, regardless of experience level, are always welcome on this call.

This free call is sponsored by NTEN.org and open to everyone. 

  • Join the call: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/81817469653

    • Meeting ID: 818 1746 9653
      Passcode: 551681

    • One tap mobile:
      +16699006833,,81817469653# US (San Jose)
      +13462487799,,81817469653# US (Houston)

    • Dial by your location:
      +1 669 900 6833 US (San Jose)
      +1 346 248 7799 US (Houston)
      +1 253 215 8782 US (Tacoma)
      +1 929 205 6099 US (New York)
      +1 301 715 8592 US (Washington DC)
      +1 312 626 6799 US (Chicago)

    • Find your local number: https://us02web.zoom.us/u/kpV1o65N

  • Follow along on Google Docs: https://nten.org/drupal/notes
  • Follow along on Twitter: #npdrupal

View notes of previous months' calls.

Tag1 Consulting: D6LTS wind down and D7 extension with Tim Lehnen

Main Drupal Feed - Wed, 05/18/2022 - 11:26

The last two years have been eventful for most of us, and the Drupal community is no exception to that. From the shift to online DrupalCons and their return to in person this year, to new releases of Drupal and the revisiting of old ones, it’s been a momentous time. Drupal 7 was originally scheduled to reach end of life (community support) in November of 2021.

Read more lynette@tag1co… Wed, 05/18/2022 - 04:26

Tag1 Consulting: D6LTS wind down and D7 extension with Tim Lehnen

Main Drupal Feed - Wed, 05/18/2022 - 11:26

The last two years have been eventful for most of us, and the Drupal community is no exception to that. From the shift to online DrupalCons and their return to in person this year, to new releases of Drupal and the revisiting of old ones, it’s been a momentous time. Drupal 7 was originally scheduled to reach end of life (community support) in November of 2021.

Read more lynette@tag1co… Wed, 05/18/2022 - 04:26

Tag1 Consulting: D6LTS wind down and D7 extension with Tim Lehnen

Main Drupal Feed - Wed, 05/18/2022 - 11:26

The last two years have been eventful for most of us, and the Drupal community is no exception to that. From the shift to online DrupalCons and their return to in person this year, to new releases of Drupal and the revisiting of old ones, it’s been a momentous time. Drupal 7 was originally scheduled to reach end of life (community support) in November of 2021.

Read more lynette@tag1co… Wed, 05/18/2022 - 04:26

OpenSense Labs: Drupal is Ensuring the Web Accessibility Standards

Main Drupal Feed - Wed, 05/18/2022 - 09:48
Drupal is Ensuring the Web Accessibility Standards Akshita Wed, 05/18/2022 - 15:18

Just like land, air, and water are meant for everyone, the web was designed to work for all people and expel any hindrance, irrespective of the surroundings and capabilities of people. But the effect of incapacity (of individuals) in the light of the fact that the web standards don’t include all in itself has become a barrier. Creating quite the paradox in the situation.

Before completing this blog, my ignorance led me to believe that web accessibility was limited to ‘accessibility only for people with disability’. Another thing that I was coxed to believe was that it is almost synonymous with visibility issues. But it is as much for a person with auditory disabilities as it is for a person with cognitive or neurological disabilities. However, I realized I was not the only one associating such wrong notions with disabilities and web accessibility.

Lack of awareness and taboos associated with disabilities often mislead us.

Ensuring that people with disability have equal and inclusive access to the resources on the web, governments and agencies follow certain guidelines in order to establish equal accessibility for all without any bias. 

What are Web Accessibility Standards and why do they matter?

The Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) explains how the web content be made more accessible to people. Here the word "content" refers to any and every kind of information in a web page, such as text (include heading and captions too), images, sounds, codes, markup - anything that defines the layout and framework.  

“WCAG is developed through the World Wide Web Consortium process with a goal of providing a single shared standard for web content accessibility that meets the needs of individuals, organizations, and governments internationally.”

Take examples of physical infrastructures like ramps and digital vision signboards, which can be used by anyone, in a similar fashion web accessibility is for everyone.

When you go out in the noon, the level of contrast can be an issue as much for a person with 6/6 vision as it can be for a person with visibility issues. Or say, older people (due to aging) face problems with changing abilities, as much as people with “temporary disabilities” such as a broken arm or lost glasses. Thus, not only web accessibility standards ensure justice for people with disability but, it is inclusive for all. 

According to the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities by the United Nations, enjoying equal human rights is a fundamental freedom. To ensure the dignity of people with disability is not a subject of ridicule, governments across the globe signed a treaty for easy web accessibility. 

How does Drupal help?

A person may face an issue either when building a website or when using it. The WCAG ensures that both the times the guidelines are followed. The World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) guidelines are then divided into two: ATAG 2.0 and WCAG 2.0. Authoring Tool Accessibility Guidelines (ATAG 2.0) addresses authoring tools and Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG 2.0) addresses Web content and is used by developers, authoring tools, and accessibility evaluation tools. 

Drupal conforms to both the guidelines. The initiative started with Drupal 7 accessibility and the community has been committed to ensuring that accessibility for all. 

What Drupal does...

The community has an accessibility team which works to identify the barriers both at the code level and the awareness level to resolve them. As a person using assistive technologies to browse the web, Drupal is built to encourage and support the semantic markup (which comes out-of-box in Drupal 8 now).

One can realize that the improvements are meant for both the visitor and administrator in the:

  • Color contrast and intensity
  • Drag and Drop functionality
  • Adding skip navigation to core themes
  • Image handling
  • Form labeling
  • Search engine form and presentation
  • Removing duplicate or null tags
  • Accessibility for Developers
Modules For Accessibility

Following are some of the Drupal modules which will assist you in keeping up with the accessibility standards. 

  1. Automatic Alt text
    The basic principle at work here is the idea of easy perceivability. Any and every information should be, thus, presented in such a way that is easily perceivable to the user. It is required for any non-text information like images and video to describe the content in the form of text for the screen readers to read it. 



    The Automatic Alt text module automatically generates an alternative text for images when no alt text has been provided by the user. This module works great for the websites and portals with user-generated content where the users may even not be aware of the purpose and importance of the Alternative text. 

    It describes the content of the image in one sentence but it doesn’t provide face recognition. 
     
  2. Block ARIA Landmark Roles
    Inspired by Block Class, Block ARAI Landmark Roles adds additional elements to the block configuration forms that allow users to assign a ARIA landmark role to a block.
     
  3. CKEditor Abbreviation
    The CKEditor Abbreviation module adds a button to CKEditor which helps in inserting and editing abbreviations in a given text. If an existing abbr tag is selected, the context menu also contains a link to edit the abbreviation.

    Abbr tag defines the abbreviation or an acronym in the content. Marking up abbreviations can give useful information to browsers, translation systems, and help boost search-engines.
     
  4. CKEditor Accessibility Checker
    The CKEditor Accessibility Checker module enables the Accessibility Checker plugin in your WYSIWYG editor. A plugin, the module lets you inspect the accessibility level of content created and immediately solve any accessibility issues that are found.
     
  5. High Contrast
    On April 13, 2011, Joseph Dolson published an article "Web Accessibility: 10 Common Developer Mistakes" stating the most common mistakes related to web accessibility and quoted that most of the issues have "more to do with a failure to understand what constitutes accessible content than with a failure to understand the technology"

    In most of the surveys, poor contrast level is often cited as the most commonly overlooked feature by the developers.

    High Contrast module, provides a quick solution to allow the user to switch between the active theme and a high contrast version of it helping them pull out of the problem.

  6. htmLawed
    According to the "Ten Common Accessibility Problems" an article by Roger Hudson, failure to use HTML header elements appropriately is one of the key accessibility issues. 

    The htmLawed module utilizes the htmLawed PHP library to limit and filter HTML for consistency with site administrator policy and standards and for security. Use of the htmLawed library allows for highly customizable control of HTML markup.

  7. Style Switcher
    The Style Switcher module takes the fuss out of creating themes or building sites with alternate stylesheets. Most of the accessibility issues have been confronted at the theming level. With this module, themers can provide a theme with alternate stylesheets. Site builder can add other alternate stylesheets right in the admin section to bring it under the right guidelines of accessibility. Allowing special styling of some part of the site, the module presents all those styles as a block with links. So any site user is able to choose the style of the site he/she prefers.

  8. Text Resize
    The handiest feature giving the end users just the right autonomy to resize the text as per their comfort of the eyesight. The Text Resize module provides the end-users with a block that can be used to quickly change the font size of text on your Drupal site. 

    It includes two buttons that can increase and decrease the size of the printed text on the page.

  9. Accessibility
    A module for the developer, Accessibility module gives you a list of available Accessibility tests, (most of which are) aligned with one or more guidelines like WCAG 2.0 or Section 508. 

    It immediately informs the site maintainer about the missing an “alt” attribute in an image, or if the headers are used appropriately. Further, each test can be customized to fit your site’s specific challenges, and customize messages users see for each test so that you can provide tips on fixing accessibility problems within the context of your site’s editing environment.

Drupal 8 Features for Accessibility 

Other than the modules that can assist you to overcome web compatibility issues, here is a list of top Drupal 8 features for easier web accessibility. 

  1. Semantics in the Core
    When an assistive device scans a web page for information, it extracts the data about the Document Object Model (DOM), or the HTML structure of the page. No further information is read by the screen reader.

    Often these assistive devices only allow a user to select to read the headings on the page or only the links. It prioritizes according to the hierarchy in which the headings and links are presented making browsing easier for users of assistive devices. 

    Drupal 8 is based on HTML5. Presenting new and better semantic components HTML5 is, in fact, one of five major initiatives outlined in Drupal 8 development. It allows theme developers to control where to use the new semantic elements and opt out entirely if they so choose. 

    When we compose semantically correct HTML, we’re telling the browser and the assistive technology what type of content it is managing with and how that information relates to other content. By doing this, assistive technology is all the more effortlessly ready to carry out its activity since it has a structure that it can work with.
     
  2. Aural Alerts
    Often page updates are expressed visually through color changes and animations. But listening to a site is a very different experience from seeing it, therefore, Drupal provides a method called “Drupal.announce()”. This helps make page updates obvious in a non-visual manner. This method creates an aria-live element on the page.

    This also lets the user know of any alert box appearing along with providing instructions to screen reader users about the tone as well. Text attached to the page is read by the assistive technologies. Drupal.announce accepts a string to be read by an audio UA. 
     
  3. Controlled Tab Order
    The accessibility issues also crop when a user uses different mediums while navigating the web. Not every user uses a mouse to navigate the website. The TabbingManager, in Drupal, is an awesome medium to direct both non-visual and non-mouse users to access the prime elements on the page in a logical order. It, thus, permits more control when exploring complex UIs.

    The tabbing manager helps in defining explicit tab order. It also allows elements besides links and form to receive keyboard focus. Without breaking the tab order it places the elements in a logical navigation flow as if it were a link on the page.
     
  4. Accessible Inline Form Errors
    It is important to provide the necessary feedback to users about the results of their form submission. Both the times when successful and when not.  This incorporates an in-line feedback that is typically provided after form submission.

    Notifications have to be concise and clear. The error message, in particular, should be easy to understand and provide simple instructions on how the situation can be resolved. And in case of successful submission, a message to confirm would do. 

    Drupal forms have turned out to be impressively more open to the expansion of available inline form errors. It is now easier for everyone to identify what errors they might have made when filling in a web form.

  5. Fieldsets
    Fieldset labels are utilized as systems for gathering related segments of forms. Effectively implemented label gives a visual diagram around the shape field gathering. This can, to a great degree, be valuable for individuals with cognitive disabilities as it viably breaks the form into subsections, making it easier to understand.

    Drupal presently uses fieldsets for radios & checkboxes in the Form API. This helps towards additionally upgrading forms in Drupal.

Conclusion

However good the features Drupal offers, in the end, it is up to the organizations to strategize and build the websites and applications around the web accessibility.   

We ensure that our different teams and interaction work together in order to make the Web more accessible to people with disabilities. At OpenSense Labs we design and develop the web technologies to ensure universal accessibility. Connect with us at hello@opensenselabs.com to make the web a better place. 

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Web Wash: Backup Drupal Sites using Backup and Migrate Module

Main Drupal Feed - Wed, 05/18/2022 - 08:39

Backup is an essential aspect for every site but often overlooked. Backup seems time-consuming and unnecessary, but when things happen, it can be a life saver freeing you from unexpected damage. It is a question of how backups can be made quickly, preferably automatically, without taking too much time. In addition, it is also essential to make sure when backups are restored, it works reliably as expected without surprises.

In this tutorial, we introduce a module that helps to provide such a solution.

The Backup and Migrate module can backup the database and files of a Drupal site. The module also provides a restore operation of the backups when needed. It can be easily installed in a Drupal site, and it is free. With this module, the authorized user can perform backup manually or automatically. Backups can flexibly include only the database or user files, or both.

When operated manually, backups can be downloaded immediately in compressed file format, or stored in a safe location in the server. When automatic operation is preferred, it can be scheduled, and the backed up files in compressed format will be stored in the server. The site can be taken offline with a notification message during the backup procedure, and return to normal after it’s completed.

Remember you should never rely entirely on a single backup solution. Things can still go wrong. The backup and restoration process may fail for many different reasons. It’s good to have a second backup system, such as at the server hosting level.

Web Wash: Backup Drupal Sites using Backup and Migrate Module

Main Drupal Feed - Wed, 05/18/2022 - 08:39

Backup is an essential aspect for every site but often overlooked. Backup seems time-consuming and unnecessary, but when things happen, it can be a life saver freeing you from unexpected damage. It is a question of how backups can be made quickly, preferably automatically, without taking too much time. In addition, it is also essential to make sure when backups are restored, it works reliably as expected without surprises.

In this tutorial, we introduce a module that helps to provide such a solution.

The Backup and Migrate module can backup the database and files of a Drupal site. The module also provides a restore operation of the backups when needed. It can be easily installed in a Drupal site, and it is free. With this module, the authorized user can perform backup manually or automatically. Backups can flexibly include only the database or user files, or both.

When operated manually, backups can be downloaded immediately in compressed file format, or stored in a safe location in the server. When automatic operation is preferred, it can be scheduled, and the backed up files in compressed format will be stored in the server. The site can be taken offline with a notification message during the backup procedure, and return to normal after it’s completed.

Remember you should never rely entirely on a single backup solution. Things can still go wrong. The backup and restoration process may fail for many different reasons. It’s good to have a second backup system, such as at the server hosting level.

Community Working Group posts: Crafting the 2022 Aaron Winborn Award

Main Drupal Feed - Tue, 05/17/2022 - 15:29

Starting in 2018, the physical award that is presented to the winner of the annual Aaron Winborn Award has been created by a Drupal community member who has volunteered their time and talents. This practice is symbolic of the importance of community service amongst our members - creating a physical manifestation of that value to be presented with gratitude.  

Rachel Lawson (former member of the Drupal Community Working Group's conflict resolution team) created hand-blown glass awards for both the 2018 and 2019 winners, Kevin Thull and Leslie Glynn. In 2020 and 2021, Bo Shipley created the award for Baddý Breidert and AmyJune Hineline

This year, the award was crafted by Caroline Achee and her husband, Louis Achee. Both Caroline and Louis are woodworkers, and often donate their time and skills to community-focused organizations in their local area. 

This year’s award was created from six different types of wood: Maple, Oak, Purple Heart, Padauk, Ribbon Mahogany, and Walnut - representing the diversity of the Drupal community. 

From Caroline:

One issue in creating the award was picking which wood to use based on the amount needed. I wanted to make the award using different woods, which would give it a layered look. The layers would represent the different layers that Drupal has and that the community is a diverse set of people that work together. 

The second issue was, should the award be in a random order of colors (which to me would look weird) or should the order be dark to light or light to dark? Something like how the Drupal code has changed through the years.

After the wood order was determined, the wood strips were stacked and glued, then the shape was cut out. A router was used to round the edges, The scroll saw was used to cut out the eyes, and then a Dremel tool was used to make the nose and mouth.

The Drupal Community Working group and the selection team thank Caroline and Louis for donating their time and talent for this year's award!

If you are interested in crafting a future Aaron Winborn Award, please let us know! drupal-cwg@drupal.org

Community Working Group posts: Crafting the 2022 Aaron Winborn Award

Main Drupal Feed - Tue, 05/17/2022 - 15:29

Starting in 2018, the physical award that is presented to the winner of the annual Aaron Winborn Award has been created by a Drupal community member who has volunteered their time and talents. This practice is symbolic of the importance of community service amongst our members - creating a physical manifestation of that value to be presented with gratitude.  

Rachel Lawson (former member of the Drupal Community Working Group's conflict resolution team) created hand-blown glass awards for both the 2018 and 2019 winners, Kevin Thull and Leslie Glynn. In 2020 and 2021, Bo Shipley created the award for Baddý Breidert and AmyJune Hineline

This year, the award was crafted by Caroline Achee and her husband, Louis Achee. Both Caroline and Louis are woodworkers, and often donate their time and skills to community-focused organizations in their local area. 

This year’s award was created from six different types of wood: Maple, Oak, Purple Heart, Padauk, Ribbon Mahogany, and Walnut - representing the diversity of the Drupal community. 

From Caroline:

One issue in creating the award was picking which wood to use based on the amount needed. I wanted to make the award using different woods, which would give it a layered look. The layers would represent the different layers that Drupal has and that the community is a diverse set of people that work together. 

The second issue was, should the award be in a random order of colors (which to me would look weird) or should the order be dark to light or light to dark? Something like how the Drupal code has changed through the years.

After the wood order was determined, the wood strips were stacked and glued, then the shape was cut out. A router was used to round the edges, The scroll saw was used to cut out the eyes, and then a Dremel tool was used to make the nose and mouth.

The Drupal Community Working group and the selection team thank Caroline and Louis for donating their time and talent for this year's award!

If you are interested in crafting a future Aaron Winborn Award, please let us know! drupal-cwg@drupal.org

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